1080p TV vs. Rift Vs. Triples
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4 posts in this topic

After having a RSeat and Fanatec wheel & pedals hooked up to my Xbox One for a couple of years, I recently upgraded to a gaming PC for AC and iRacing since I tried AC at the Porsche Experience Center LA and that is what they use.  My setup is currently hooked up to a 60 hz 70" 1080p TV in my loft and so I know a monitor set up is better with faster refresh rates (although not sure why this is better).  I got an Oculus Rift but couldn't get rid of the nausea so think I need to get a monitor or triple monitors.   A couple of questions, 1) why is a faster refresh rate better?   2) does it make you a better sim racer?  3) are triples good so you can have more perspective when driving?    Lastly, do most people play AC or iRacing?  Thanks for any feedback.  

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Refresh Rates
On the one hand, in blind tests most gamers that haven't had much experience with a monitor faster than 60Hz almost can't tell the difference if they were tested... HOWEVER, those gamers with 100+ Hz monitors can usually identify one versus the other about 90% of the time. Essentially, once you've spent any amount of time in front of a faster monitor, it's very easier to "notice" slower monitors, and once you're at that point, the difference can be distracting on the slower monitors. You become "spoiled" by the difference and experience. From an advantage or benefits standpoint, faster rates are easier on your eyes, and it helps with the immersion... but I wouldn't go so far as to say it makes you better sim-racer. Overall, It makes the experience soo much better.

Very important: If you wish to use a faster monitor, you must have a GPU that can "supply" adequate frame rates to match or surpass the Hz rate.

Single or Triple
If you have the space, can afford triples, have the PC/GPU that can adequately run those monitors, and you're willing to deal with some of the problems that running triples may present, then I'd say go for it... if you can get a good deal on them, and NEVER plan to use VR. Another option is a nice ultra-wide screen, It doesn't give you the full view of triples, but it gives you a lot more than regular monitors, takes up less space, and is easier to manage with your PC hardware. I have a 144 Hz BENQ XR3501, and I love it... when I'm not using VR.

1080, 2k, 4k
If you have a GPU that can run a 4K monitor at 100 FPS... well, then that's awesome... though you usually have to turn down your graphics settings to achieve that. Personally, I prefer my 2560 x 1080 screen because I can easily get 144+ FPS with my current system with ultra graphics settings. The faster FPS and ultra graphics are more important to me than being able to lean in close to a 4K monitor's screen and not see any pixels.

VR
Overall, if you can figure out what's causing your nausea, nothing beats VR... even with the current "low-res" screen-door displays. Being able to look around freely, look into turns, and glance at your mirrors significantly contribute to the experience and immersion.

Many people have bad experiences and nausea in VR for a few reasons...

1. They aren't wearing the headset properly--the back strap needs to be as low as comfortably possible on the back of your head. Be sure to adjust the straps as necessary.

2. They haven't adjusted the distance between the lenses

3. Improper VR setup in games/simulators. FOV, scaling, and "head" placement can make a difference.

3. They experience low frame-rates and tracking issues in the VR headset due to PC and GPU hardware issues. CPU and GPU speeds, USB issues, and sensor placement can all be factors.

Recently, I upgraded from an i5 GTX970 PC to an i7 GTX1080Ti PC. Before, with the older system, I was having tracking hiccups, and getting 45FPS per eye (that alternates to simulate 90FPS). With the new system, I get a rock-solid 90FPS per eye, and experience very few tracking hiccups. One of the big differences I noticed was how the faster FPS improves what you see in your "peripheral" vision. At the alternating 45 FPS, I could see flickering at the edges of my FOV. At 90 FPS per eye, I don't see that at all.

After setting up my newest system, I loaded up Project CARS 2 for some testing in VR with my Oculus Rift. I set up a five-lap Porsche race on the Nordschleife in the late afternoon. Though I started near the back, I easily passed most of the AI cars and began enjoying the experience. When I entered the long straight, the evening sun was shining through the windshield, casting lens flares across my view that reacted accordingly to my head movements and "bouncing" around in the seat. At that point, my eyes actually did tear up a little, and I felt a tingling in my chest. Not from fatigue or nausea, but because the experience was so fantastic and "real," so very close (without feeling the bumps and elevation changes) to the real thing.

Edited by ApexVGear

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I will try to make this easy . I have tried all three . Here is what i have used from beginning to present time. 

Single 1080P 60 Inch withPlaystation and Xbox

Triple 1080P 60 Inch center and 2x49 inch 1080P left/right with 3x Xboxzzz playing Forza 4

I then made the plunge to PC :

Started with 3x 49 Inch 1080P  at 70HZ  which I enjoyed for sometime and actually won a few races on different sims . The Refresh rate (HZ) was not an issue for me. 

One of the 49 inch tv's stopped working so I decided to go into actual PC monitors . Which I did for about 2 days 3x27 inch 1080P 120HZ I believe .I had to return them . Why you ask.

I was so used to the 49 Inch that going to a 27 inch was just "eeewwwwll" to small and not as bright . So I decide to shop around for 4K tv . After a few days of searching I found this

Vizio M43-C1 120HZ  yes actually a 4K TV with 120HZ refresh rate so I bought them for just under $1000.00 all three great deal. I was very happy with this setup and I presently still use them . One of the three (center) started to have issues so I just swapped my right side monitor . I then decided to jump into VR (Oculus Rift CV1) and to make this story a short one this is the only way I race except for Forza 7 on PC and Automobilista (I really don't play much) 

I do use my triples for shooter games and other types of video games . If one of my other 4K tv's takes a poop moving forward I will just stick with my VR and a single high quality 43 inch or 49 inch no bigger 4K TV with HDR . So if I where you and I'm not and your starting fresh this is what I . I mean you should do.

1 x High or good quality 4K with HDR tv at 60HZ with true motion at 120 HZ unless you can find one that has actual 120 HZ .

Continue with VR . Like the previous post mentioned make sure your VR settings are set correctly in game , games ini.files . This helped me greatly . 

1. They aren't wearing the headset properly--the back strap needs to be as low as comfortably possible on the back of your head. Be sure to adjust the straps as necessary.

2. They haven't adjusted the distance between the lenses

3. Improper VR setup in games/simulators. FOV, scaling, and "head" placement can make a difference.

3. They are experience low frame-rates and tracking issues in the VR headset due to PC and GPU hardware issues. CPU and GPU speeds, USB issues, and sensor placement can all be factors.

Good luck If you have any questions feel free to ask. I believe all us geeks I mean sim/video game enthusiasts have asked these same questions , shhh.....t     I know I did.  

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6 hours ago, ApexVGear said:

Refresh Rates
On the one hand, in blind tests most gamers that haven't had much experience with a monitor faster than 60Hz almost can't tell the difference if they were tested... HOWEVER, those gamers with 100+ Hz monitors can usually identify one versus the other about 90% of the time. Essentially, once you've spent any amount of time in front of a faster monitor, it's very easier to "notice" slower monitors, and once you're at that point, the difference can be distracting on the slower monitors. You become "spoiled" by the difference and experience. From an advantage or benefits standpoint, faster rates are easier on your eyes, and it helps with the immersion... but I wouldn't go so far as to say it makes you better sim-racer. Overall, It makes the experience soo much better.

Very important: If you wish to use a faster monitor, you must have a GPU that can "supply" adequate frame rates to match or surpass the Hz rate.

Single or Triple
If you have the space, can afford triples, have the PC/GPU that can adequately run those monitors, and you're willing to deal with some of the problems that running triples may present, then I'd say go for it... if you can get a good deal on them, and NEVER plan to use VR. Another option is a nice ultra-wide screen, It doesn't give you the full view of triples, but it gives you a lot more than regular monitors, takes up less space, and is easier to manage with your PC hardware. I have a 144 Hz BENQ XR3501, and I love it... when I'm not using VR.

1080, 2k, 4k
If you have a GPU that can run a 4K monitor at 100 FPS... well, then that's awesome... though you usually have to turn down your graphics settings to achieve that. Personally, I prefer my 2560 x 1080 screen because I can easily get 144+ FPS with my current system with ultra graphics settings. The faster FPS and ultra graphics are more important to me than being able to lean in close to a 4K monitor's screen and not see any pixels.

VR
Overall, if you can figure out what's causing your nausea, nothing beats VR... even with the current "low-res" screen-door displays. Being able to look around freely, look into turns, and glance at your mirrors significantly contribute to the experience and immersion.

Many people have bad experiences and nausea in VR for a few reasons...

1. They aren't wearing the headset properly--the back strap needs to be as low as comfortably possible on the back of your head. Be sure to adjust the straps as necessary.

2. They haven't adjusted the distance between the lenses

3. Improper VR setup in games/simulators. FOV, scaling, and "head" placement can make a difference.

3. They experience low frame-rates and tracking issues in the VR headset due to PC and GPU hardware issues. CPU and GPU speeds, USB issues, and sensor placement can all be factors.

Recently, I upgraded from an i5 GTX970 PC to an i7 GTX1080Ti PC. Before, with the older system, I was having tracking hiccups, and getting 45FPS per eye (that alternates to simulate 90FPS). With the new system, I get a rock-solid 90FPS per eye, and experience very few tracking hiccups. One of the big differences I noticed was how the faster FPS improves what you see in your "peripheral" vision. At the alternating 45 FPS, I could see flickering at the edges of my FOV. At 90 FPS per eye, I don't see that at all.

After setting up my newest system, I loaded up Project CARS 2 for some testing in VR with my Oculus Rift. I set up a five-lap Porsche race on the Nordschleife in the late afternoon. Though I started near the back, I easily passed most of the AI cars and began enjoying the experience. When I entered the long straight, the evening sun was shining through the windshield, casting lens flares across my view that reacted accordingly to my head movements and "bouncing" around in the seat. At that point, my eyes actually did tear up a little, and I felt a tingling in my chest. Not from fatigue or nausea, but because the experience was so fantastic and "real," so very close (without feeling the bumps and elevation changes) to the real thing.

Thanks for taking the time to reply, I really appreciate it.  For the Oculus Rift, I didn't have issues with other apps in "comfort" mode and I tried adjusted the distance of the lenses and I think the head strap was adjusted properly so while I could be the setup, when I went to the Porsche Experience and paid $50 to do VR before my $900 ride in a GT3 on the track, I got nauseated after 1 lap so I just think it's something I can't get rid of regardless.  Google VR was very cool but I think I'll wait till the Vive Pro is cheaper than $1,300 since it looks like the graphics are 80% better and I didn't care for the "screen door" effect.   My PC is i5 with Nvidia 1060 graphics card so I didn't have issues with Rift.

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