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Question about Next Level Racing V3

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Hi guys

I'm planning to buy the V3 motion platform, and I am using VR. I see that it has VR compensation, and that's generally a good thing.. But will this stop me from having positional tracking? Can I no longer lean inwards, outwards and to the sides when in a car?

 

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I've been running the NLR v3 platform on my rig for the last 2 weeks.  Works like a champ in VR.  IMHO, it's not a gimick at all.  You have to dial the motion settings way-down; a little motion goes a long way.  VR works exactly as before.  You can look in, over, around, wherever you want.  VR compensation works like a champ in the NLR software.

I posted a full review of the V3 motion rig in the "motion" section here, but hardly anyone ever looks over there.  So, if you don't mind, I'll repost some of my comments on the V3 here.  

-----

I've always wanted to purchase a full motion platform, but the really good stuff was well into the 5-digits in cost. Along comes the Next Level Racing under-seat units, and I did a bit of research before diving in and purchasing this unit.

The first big decision is seat mover vs. whole platform. Like many, I first thought that seat movers were inferior. Honestly, I was wrong. The trick to motion simulators is fooling your body into feeling the forces of actual racing. This is more than just g-forces in corners. It's engine revs, road feel, bumper strips, cobbles, surge, sway, and many, many others. And here's the secret: you need to feel the FORCE, not necessarily a huge range of MOTION. A seat mover in many ways is superior in this respect to a full-motion simulator.

 *Speed* (well, technically acceleration) of the simulator is more important than range of motion. force=mass x accleration. This works in 2 ways with a motion simulator. First, to really accelerate something to impart a force, you want to move as little additional mass as possible. A seat-mover just does this. It moves you and a relatively light seat, that's it. Full motion platforms move a lot more, much more. So they need bigger actuators, more room, and more $$$. The second part that matters is the actual speed of the actuators themselves. Far more imporant than range of motion is the acceleration of the platform itself. And the Next Level Racing v3 is FAST. Uber-fast. It can really jolt you around, much more than you'd think just looking at the videos.

The actuators are very quick, giving sharp impulses when needed, and they update at ridiculous speeds, too (>400 times/s). This means fine movement and vibration is well simulated, including engine revs, road imperfections, cobble strips, etc. The v3 works brilliantly. I added the V3 to my RSeat RS-1 racing rig, using Next Level Racing supplied adapter plates. In addition to the motion platform, I run a Fanatec Wheel and Pedals, and can go either triple-40" monitors or Oculus VR. Took me about a day to get everything hooked up and working. One tip: the serial number is on the bottom of the unit. Write this down/take a picture of the name tag, as you'll need it when downloading the software from NLR. Once installed, it will be very hard to read that serial number.

Now, here's the headline: motion + VR is MIND BLOWING. This is it folks. The point where virtual simulation stimulates enough of your senses to fool your brain into thinking you're doing the real thing. The motion sensation in VR is absolutely jaw-dropping. Project Cars in an open wheel series is the closest I've come in a simulation to reality. A little motion goes a long way, and the motion platform does far more than just track g-forces. It simulates engine revs, road texture, siding strips, bumps, just about everything. I found I had to dial-down the settings from stock. The amount of motion needed to trick your brain in VR is much less than what you see in the factory videos. The manufacturers want to sell you on wild movements in the videos, but that's much to much in practice. Dial back the amplitude of the motion, and let the ultra-fast actuators provide impulses and g-forces to your body that really does a fabulous job of mimicking the real thing.

Beyond the bread-and-butter racing simulators, I've found the V3 excels for flight and (especially) roller coaster simulators! Here, in addition to the short vibrations and shocks from the track, you want to simulate the overall g-feeling of coasters. To do this, the platfrom moves a much larger amplitude, to change the position of your body with respect to gravity. And it works! In No Limits Coaster 2, I honestly feel like I'm on the rides, when used with the Oculus Rift. Here, the motion platform tilts the chair quite a bit, and it works brilliantly! Previously, I would get motion sick in the coaster simulators. With the motion platform, your body feels what your eyes see, and I haven't gotten any nausea at all since installing the V3. The Coaster Simulation is another great way to introduce your friends to VR/Motion Platforms as well.

Overall, I'm thrilled with the v3 motion platform. It's not cheap, but compared to other alternatives, the $3k entry point is a bargain compared to other high-end solutions. You really do have to try this to appreciate it. This is a new standard in simulators accessible to the dedicated home user and enthusiast. With a good racing chair, wheel, pedals, VR, and the PC to drive it all, you can scratch all your racing itches and never buy a set of tires again. Bravo, Next Level Racing, and thank you for this excellent piece of hardware.

 

IMG_0194_zpsi0eoom9c.jpg

 

IMG_0199_zpsnawwco5s.jpg

 

IMG_0204_zpscdxsh1v6.jpg

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Wow thank you for this detailed post. Really helped me a lot :) I am going to buy it, but I have a big dilemma. I am planning on buying the v3 and gtultimate, but I don't think it can handle a mige motor on it. I don't know what to do about it.

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See my reply in your other post; neither company lists the adapter plates on the website.  Write them, they'll provide info.  RSeat provided my adapter for free when I ordered my N-1; Next Level Racing sold me a set of adapter plates for $199 shipped.

I'm not sure about the Buttkicker adapter with either of these.  I'd ask RSeat via their contact form.  They've been very responsive to me when I've asked questions.  

Good luck!

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On 3/23/2017 at 2:15 PM, Diablo2112 said:

I've been running the NLR v3 platform on my rig for the last 2 weeks.  Works like a champ in VR.  IMHO, it's not a gimick at all.  You have to dial the motion settings way-down; a little motion goes a long way.  VR works exactly as before.  You can look in, over, around, wherever you want.  VR compensation works like a champ in the NLR software.

I posted a full review of the V3 motion rig in the "motion" section here, but hardly anyone ever looks over there.  So, if you don't mind, I'll repost some of my comments on the V3 here.  

-----

I've always wanted to purchase a full motion platform, but the really good stuff was well into the 5-digits in cost. Along comes the Next Level Racing under-seat units, and I did a bit of research before diving in and purchasing this unit.

The first big decision is seat mover vs. whole platform. Like many, I first thought that seat movers were inferior. Honestly, I was wrong. The trick to motion simulators is fooling your body into feeling the forces of actual racing. This is more than just g-forces in corners. It's engine revs, road feel, bumper strips, cobbles, surge, sway, and many, many others. And here's the secret: you need to feel the FORCE, not necessarily a huge range of MOTION. A seat mover in many ways is superior in this respect to a full-motion simulator.

 *Speed* (well, technically acceleration) of the simulator is more important than range of motion. force=mass x accleration. This works in 2 ways with a motion simulator. First, to really accelerate something to impart a force, you want to move as little additional mass as possible. A seat-mover just does this. It moves you and a relatively light seat, that's it. Full motion platforms move a lot more, much more. So they need bigger actuators, more room, and more $$$. The second part that matters is the actual speed of the actuators themselves. Far more imporant than range of motion is the acceleration of the platform itself. And the Next Level Racing v3 is FAST. Uber-fast. It can really jolt you around, much more than you'd think just looking at the videos.

The actuators are very quick, giving sharp impulses when needed, and they update at ridiculous speeds, too (>400 times/s). This means fine movement and vibration is well simulated, including engine revs, road imperfections, cobble strips, etc. The v3 works brilliantly. I added the V3 to my RSeat RS-1 racing rig, using Next Level Racing supplied adapter plates. In addition to the motion platform, I run a Fanatec Wheel and Pedals, and can go either triple-40" monitors or Oculus VR. Took me about a day to get everything hooked up and working. One tip: the serial number is on the bottom of the unit. Write this down/take a picture of the name tag, as you'll need it when downloading the software from NLR. Once installed, it will be very hard to read that serial number.

Now, here's the headline: motion + VR is MIND BLOWING. This is it folks. The point where virtual simulation stimulates enough of your senses to fool your brain into thinking you're doing the real thing. The motion sensation in VR is absolutely jaw-dropping. Project Cars in an open wheel series is the closest I've come in a simulation to reality. A little motion goes a long way, and the motion platform does far more than just track g-forces. It simulates engine revs, road texture, siding strips, bumps, just about everything. I found I had to dial-down the settings from stock. The amount of motion needed to trick your brain in VR is much less than what you see in the factory videos. The manufacturers want to sell you on wild movements in the videos, but that's much to much in practice. Dial back the amplitude of the motion, and let the ultra-fast actuators provide impulses and g-forces to your body that really does a fabulous job of mimicking the real thing.

Beyond the bread-and-butter racing simulators, I've found the V3 excels for flight and (especially) roller coaster simulators! Here, in addition to the short vibrations and shocks from the track, you want to simulate the overall g-feeling of coasters. To do this, the platfrom moves a much larger amplitude, to change the position of your body with respect to gravity. And it works! In No Limits Coaster 2, I honestly feel like I'm on the rides, when used with the Oculus Rift. Here, the motion platform tilts the chair quite a bit, and it works brilliantly! Previously, I would get motion sick in the coaster simulators. With the motion platform, your body feels what your eyes see, and I haven't gotten any nausea at all since installing the V3. The Coaster Simulation is another great way to introduce your friends to VR/Motion Platforms as well.

Overall, I'm thrilled with the v3 motion platform. It's not cheap, but compared to other alternatives, the $3k entry point is a bargain compared to other high-end solutions. You really do have to try this to appreciate it. This is a new standard in simulators accessible to the dedicated home user and enthusiast. With a good racing chair, wheel, pedals, VR, and the PC to drive it all, you can scratch all your racing itches and never buy a set of tires again. Bravo, Next Level Racing, and thank you for this excellent piece of hardware.

 

IMG_0194_zpsi0eoom9c.jpg

 

IMG_0199_zpsnawwco5s.jpg

 

IMG_0204_zpscdxsh1v6.jpg

Awesome rig! I enjoy my NLR V3 too! Haven't had much seat time with my Oculus CV1. I was curious what motion settings do you tune down on the NLR V3 to? I know its personal preference but would like to try settings other people actually use. I just feel like with me messing with those settings, I'm pretending that I know what I'm doing but not sure if the translation of what I'm looking for is accurate. lol!

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