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Thrustmaster T3PA-PRO Pedal Set Review

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Even with the cost of the Bodinhausen adapter, the Bodnar cable, AND a BLC-T500 Load Cell Mod, the T3PA-Pro pedals are still FAR cheaper than the MPCC or HPP pedals -- and, once you dress-out your T3PA-Pro (or T500) pedals like that, they are FAR superior to the Fanatec CSPs, IMO.  Rock-solid, built like a tank, and a durable and proven design that's incredibly simple to switch between F1 and GT mode . . . you don't get that kind of versatility in pedals costing 3 - 4 times as much.

 

 

 

True, but they still won't work with a cswv2 on xbox and ps4 though.... darn me and needing compatibility with everything >_<

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Hi everyone.

Yes, the bar you mentioned can be removed, a bit of a pain without the right tools, you just take the "C" clips out and remove the bar.

As for mounting the T500 (T3PA Pro) inverted on a Obutto R3volution, it's actually quite easy since I did that from the get go when I 1st built my R3volution.

It's a matter of drilling 2 holes in the side tabs of the pedal plate (Picture 1) and using "U" clamps to secure the top of the pedal plate to the existing R3volution's horizontal tubes (Picture 2).

The T500 pedals fit perfectly using the existing mounting holes in the pedal plate (Picture 3 and 4). This is rock solid as I seriously lean into my brake pedal and the pedal plate don't budge at all with no flex whatsoever. :)

I have to agree with John, I liked the CPS (v1), they are gorgeous pedals, adjustable and so on, but after trying the T500 pedals, the CSP's feel kind of wimpy by comparison (especially the load cell), I'm also happy to report that I've been using a Bodin Load Cell mod for over 2 years now without a single problem, still as rock solid as the day I got it. Don't get me wrong, I love the looks of a lot of these after marker pedals, they are downright sexy looking but then again, I don't spend a terrible amount of time looking at my feet (which are size 12 by the way and I'm only 5'7" tall, somewhere in the genes dept, someone had a good laugh. lol) :shock:

I'm happy enough with the feel (that solid built like a tank feel) of the T500 pedals and with the Bodin Load Cell Mod, I have no reason to look elsewhere for pedals. :)

Take care

 

 

Regards:  >>>> Jack <<<<

 

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dont be dupped into thinking that this brake mod (rubber stopper) has the same effect as a loadcell...that is bs.  a buddy of mine went from thrustmaster to cspv1 with a loadcell and was faster within a few laps.  do your research.

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Of course, the BLC-T500 Load Cell Mod for the T500 pedals will work with the T3PA-Pro pedals.  Should be rolling out more soon, basement remodel should be done this week, then all that will remain will be to reclaim/reorganize my workbench and parts stock so I can get down to business building stuff.

 

Beyond that, I might be needing some T3PA owners in the not so distant future to serve as load cell beta testers, FWIW.

 

B)

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Of course, the BLC-T500 Load Cell Mod for the T500 pedals will work with the T3PA-Pro pedals.  Should be rolling out more soon, basement remodel should be done this week, then all that will remain will be to reclaim/reorganize my workbench and parts stock so I can get down to business building stuff.

 

Beyond that, I might be needing some T3PA owners in the not so distant future to serve as load cell beta testers, FWIW.

 

B)

 

oh interesting a T3PA load cell, i'd be interested in helping out beta testing that.

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Went into my local rubber shop, came out with some sort of conical brake mod for my T500 pedals:  :cool:

(I'm super happy with the feel and progression! And it can be adjusted to taste (travel, pressure))

 

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so is a piece of rubber as good as a loadcell these days??   i used to have a squash ball behind the pedal on my dfgt's....i assume these pedals still measure the distance of travel rather than pressure applied.

 

Short answer is no, a rubber bushing is not as good as a proper load cell, because the pedals are indeed still just measuring the travel rather than the pressure applied -- and there's a dirty little secret about the conical brake mod and other similar mods (like the rubber bushing mods from Basherboards):  Since these kind of mods limit the pedal travel, that means that all of your pedal input is occurring over a much smaller portion of the brake potentiometer's full range. 

 

This has two effects:

 

1)  Your effective pedal resolution is greatly reduced when using something like the conical brake mod.  Looking at range of motion and pedal resolution, if the brake pedal has a stock range of motion of 3" and the conical brake mod reduces the range of travel down to 1/2", for example, and if the stock resolution of the brake pedal is 4024 steps, then the conical brake mod would reduce your brake pedal's range of motion by 83%, thus reducing your pedal resolution down to 684 steps.  This is going to make your braking inputs much more granular, and less precise.  Also;

 

2)  With a reduced range of motion -- assuming that you've reduced the amount of travel from 3" down to 1/2" -- that means you'll be applying all of your brake inputs across just 16% of the brake potentiometer's surface, and ultimately this is going to cause that small potion of the potentiometer to wear out much more quickly than the remaining 83% of the brake potentiometer. 

 

So, ultimately, your brake inputs will be of a much lower resolution, and as that 16% range of the potentiometer wears out over time, your inputs will become more "noisy," making it harder to brake properly.  If you decide at that point to do away with the conical mod and just use the full range of the pedal, you will likely have a "dead spot," or a "noisy" spot at that point of the pedal's travel, which will contribute to more erratic and less reliable braking.

 

Thrustmaster typically charges $60 for replacement pots for the T500RS (T3PA-Pro) pedals, and nobody has been able to find a suitable retail replacement (both MrBasher and I have spent much time searching, and we've found nothing).  Note also that while it's fairly easy to access the potentiometers on the T500RS / T3PA-Pro pedals, the T3PA pedals are a different beast altogether -- in order to get to one of the pedals, you have to disassemble ALL THREE pedals, and then reassemble ALL THREE correctly.  The T3PA pedals are built a lot like the stock pedals in terms of assembly/disassembly, and even though there are only 2 pedals in the stock setup, trying to reassemble them is a spring-loaded nightmare (trust me on this), so the 3-pedal T3PA's are going to be frightful to disassemble/reassemble. 

 

So, while things like the conical brake mod may feel quite good initially, and they may work well, it's ultimately NOT as good of a solution as a good load cell, which essentially never wears out (assuming that we're talking about a good, solid, beam-type load cell, and not the small "bathroom scale" pressure sensors used by Fanatec in their pedals).

 

The best long-term solution is a good load cell mod, IMO -- and I say that as a user, not just as someone who produces load cell mods for TM pedals. 

 

;)

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Is there a review anywhere that reviews the Load Cell mods for the T3PA-Pro in comparison to each other?

None that I know of -- best you can do is view the ISR review of the Ricmotech load cell and then view their review of the Bodin Solutions BLC-T500 load cell. 

I get the feeling that the Ricmotech load cell might be stiffer than mine, and installation is more intrusive (disassembly required, which would probably void your pedal warranty) and time consuming.

I think I win straight-up in terms of cost, though.

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None that I know of -- best you can do is view the ISR review of the Ricmotech load cell and then view their review of the Bodin Solutions BLC-T500 load cell. 

I get the feeling that the Ricmotech load cell might be stiffer than mine, and installation is more intrusive (disassembly required, which would probably void your pedal warranty) and time consuming.

I think I win straight-up in terms of cost, though.

Yeah, my own comparison based on the reviews I watched and read had me breaking them down to this...

 

Bodin -

- Pro(s):

1. ~$10-$20 cheaper than the Ricmotech (important to me because I'm on a shoe-string budget)

2. Fairly easy install (at least easier than the Ricmotech)

3. Shouldn't void manufacturing warranty (and likely any extended warranties too)

4. Supposedly works with pedals inverted too (but how well? can problems be encountered; especially, when paired with a Playseat challenge?)

5. The simpler design should lessen the chances of something breaking down the road (I would imagine)

- Unknown(s):

1. Version 2 (or whatever version you're on now; anyways, couldn't find a review) supposedly improved the stiffness over the original version by lessening it, but it's not quite clear to me from people who've used both load cells on which one they preferred from the stiffness side?

2. Does the required foot pressure to apply full brakes work on a Playseat Challenge without causing problems to the pedal holding device attached to the seat? I don't think the extra 7 pounds of difference between the Bodin (v2) and Ricmotech load cells will make that huge of a difference in relation to my last question?

3. Piggy-backing off the last point; does using the brakes in an inverted setup cause any issues within a Playseat Challenge?

4. The deadzone adjustments and feeling between the Bodin and Ricmotech isn't very clear from the reviews I've read and watched; again, from those who've used both do they find one "feels" better than the other?

5. Doesn't have the eased brake pedal return like the Ricmotech, but I'm not sure if this is a positive or negative? It's probably a little of both.

- Con(s):

1. Visually not as pleasing as the Ricmotech (doesn't mean too much for many people probably)

2. Seems to have noticeably less pedal travel in comparison to the Ricmotech (perhaps the biggest negative?)

3. Doesn't have a secondary resistance factor like the Ricmotech which supposedly offers a more "real" feel (or maybe this is the bigger negative?)

4. Availability -- not always easily available.

 

Ricmotech -

- Pro(s):

1. Visually more pleasing than the Bodin (may not mean too much to many people)

2. Better pedal travel (perhaps the biggest positive in relation to better "feel" argument?)

3. Better "real" brake feel (might be more of a subjective argument; maybe?)

4. Newest version provides a minor amount of customized adjustability to a user's preferred feel (included 2 different bushings and spacers) 

5. Availability in comparison to the Bodin -- often easily available.

- Unknown(s):

1. pretty much all the "unknowns" under Bodin can be mimic'd here; though, on a more specific level does 7 less pounds of required pressure to reach max braking make much difference in preventing issues from occurring in a Playseat Challenge?

2. Is the eased brake pedal return a positive or negative for most people?

3. Does it work with the pedals inverted? (I would imagine so, but does it also introduce any potential increased wear and tear issues?)

4. Is the deadzone better or worse than the Bodin? (I imagine better, but that's a complete guess)

5. Supposedly stiffer than the Bodin; true/false? (Only someone who's used both new versions can say)

- Con(s):

1. ~$10-$20 more expensive than the Bodin (a fairly big negative for me)

2. Not as easy of an install as the Bodin (kind of another big negative for me) 

3. Will void out the manufacturer's warranty, but would it void out any potential extended warranty that might be offered by a retailer? (If I buy used pedals this won't mean as much)

4. More things to potentially have problems with increases the risk factor of buying this product

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Big plus on Ricmotech side is, that you can buy it right now any time. John's solution comes and goes out of stock. I recently bought ricmotech's load cell and I'm very pleased with the product. It's not that hard to install and it works with inverted pedals.

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BLC-T500 units are currently in stock on the Bodin Solutions site.  :cool:

The load cell mod works great in the inverted position -- that's how I use mine.

NO idea on Playseat compatibility when inverted, though -- if you can invert the unmodified T500 (or T3PA-Pro) pedals with the Playseat, then you can invert them when equipped with the BLC-T500 Load Cell Mod.  :)

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I have heard good things about John Bodin's load cell, I have not tried it myself to offer a side-by-side comparison. However, I can shed some light on the unknowns of the Ricmotech. The 7 pound difference is probably negligible, especially since you should rarely be applying maximum braking anyway. The eased pedal return is strictly personal preference. It works perfectly with inverted pedals. Some early version 1 kits had an issue that caused some of them to fail, but later version 1 and all version 2 can be used inverted. The dead zone can be adjusted to 3 different settings; starting at none. There are 2 washers included to help do that. I cannot speak as to the stiffness from personal experience and I don't recall if the review videos mention it.

An added plus that is not mentioned in the product description is that the brake springs that get removed during installation can be relocated to the clutch to improve the feel of it.

I hope this clears things up for you.

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