Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

FOV vrs POV and importance of Field of View in iRacing

26 posts in this topic

I like many other new iRacing members was quite confused on the exact do's and don'ts of FOV in the sim. Now I know 90% of iRacers probably know this info and how to change all this stuff but I wanted to put up a tutorial for people who are in the shoes that I was in about a week ago. It can be quite confusing for a beginner. I did a lot of searching around to master this stuff and I would like to send out a special thanks to "UNKLE" here on this forum because he gave me some info that I had no idea about but once I fiddled around with what he had suggested for a bit the FOV vrs POV issue magically made complete sense! He also made a point of the importance to maintain the suggested field of view in iRacing and how to manipulate your cockpit view without distorting you FOV. Thanks again UNKLE.

 

So after messing with this stuff and getting a complete understanding of it I thought it would be appropriate to make a video to try and help the new guys like myself understand this stuff and how to fix their POVs without ruining their lap times. So down below is a vid with some explanations and directions of how to address these issues safely.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You did a Great job on this video on explaining how to fix the "POV". Except you didn't tell people how to save the "New" POV in the car. I did really like the video great stuff to help people. There are some others also that have made videos on this subject like Empty Box for one. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been an iRacing member since 2012, and I did not know this. I knew about the replay camera editor, but I did not know that it could also affect your driving view camera. Thanks for making and sharing this video! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unkle probably told you about this but by changing the setting called key step factor (put it down all the way to 0.050 I believe) on your camera edit tap you can make much smaller adjustements to your seat position with the x axis ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been an iRacing member since 2012, and I did not know this. I knew about the replay camera editor, but I did not know that it could also affect your driving view camera. Thanks for making and sharing this video! 

 

Yeah this was amazing to me once I was told about this. Really glad this video helped for you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unkle probably told you about this but by changing the setting called key step factor (put it down all the way to 0.050 I believe) on your camera edit tap you can make much smaller adjustements to your seat position with the x axis ;)

 

Actually I did not know that. That is good to know. I am going to play around with it some more tonight so I will check this out! Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the complements krazydanprod and it's cool of you to post a video to help others

 

The little things can sometimes make a big difference.

 

I was thinking about my post to you while I was walking home the other day and an analogy struck me that might help some figure out the difference.

 

To me the FOV is like the lens in a camera and just like when you are making a video the majority of times you want the lens to capture the real world as accurately as possible.  So you wouldn't for example use a fish eye lens to make a video because it will distort the image in the same way you don't want to use an inaccurate FOV because it will distort the field of view.

 

The POV doesn't affect the lens on the camera it is simply moving the camera around in the real world to get the shot you like, in the same way that you can edit the camera cockpit view any way you want without affecting the FOV.

 

Another tip is that if your monitors are positioned higher or lower than the average setup then play around with the P setting so that you are looking straight down the track to the horizon while looking straight ahead as opposed to looking slightly down at the tarmac or slightly up to the sky while looking straight ahead.

 

Another tip I have is that if you have entered the info into the calculator as accurately as you can, then if you drive round and look at the crash barriers at each side monitor (I like to use Watkins Glen for this test) and see any distortion in the crash barrier where the side and center monitors bezels meet then it's likely the angle set in the FOV calculator is slightly off from the physical angle of your side monitors and/or the FOV horizon is slightly off. 

 

So try making some small adjustments to the angle setting in the FOV calculator and/or changing the height of the FOV horizon to see if you can eliminate the distortion.  This is easier to do than physically moving your monitors to the correct position.

 

Any skipping/jumping that you see as an object moves from the center monitor to the side monitor indicates that your bezel compensation is slightly off.

 

This might seem obvious but remember too that if you ever move your seat on a slider at any point then you also need to tweak your FOV to accommodate the seating changes.

 

Thankfully with the Oculus we'll no longer have to worry about this process although it'll change to IPD settings and eye to neck distance and so on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the complements krazydanprod and it's cool of you to post a video to help others

 

The little things can sometimes make a big difference.

 

I was thinking about my post to you while I was walking home the other day and an analogy struck me that might help some figure out the difference.

 

To me the FOV is like the lens in a camera and just like when you are making a video the majority of times you want the lens to capture the real world as accurately as possible.  So you wouldn't for example use a fish eye lens to make a video because it will distort the image in the same way you don't want to use an inaccurate FOV because it will distort the field of view.

 

The POV doesn't affect the lens on the camera it is simply moving the camera around in the real world to get the shot you like, in the same way that you can edit the camera cockpit view any way you want without affecting the FOV.

 

Another tip is that if your monitors are positioned higher or lower than the average setup then play around with the P setting so that your are looking straight down the track to the horizon while looking straight ahead as opposed to looking slightly down at the tarmac or slightly up to the sky while looking straight ahead.

 

Another tip I have is that if you have entered the info into the calculator as accurately as you can, then if you drive round and look at the crash barriers at each side monitor (I like to use Watkins Glen for this test) and see any distortion in the crash barrier where the side and center monitors bezels meet then it's likely the angle set in the FOV calculator is slightly off from the physical angle of your side monitors and/or the FOV horizon is slightly off. 

 

So try making some small adjustments to the angle setting in the FOV calculator and/or changing the height of the FOV horizon to see if you can eliminate the distortion.  This is easier to do than physically moving your monitors.

 

Any skipping/jumping that you see as an object moves from the side monitor to the center monitor indicates that your bezel compensation is slightly off.

 

Remember too that if you ever move your seat on a slider at any point then you also need to tweak your FOV

 

Great information! I will try these things when I get home.

 

One question I have that you may be able to answer is that. (actually you may have answered above but I haven't gotten home to test yet) I have got my seat extremely close to the ground because because raising it up at all causes an angle change to my eye between the center and outside monitors. I see this particularly with the walls on the outside of the track. If i raise my head up it gets worse and if I lower my head it levels out and then gets worse in the other direction when it gets to far. An example can be seen in the video above because the camera is so much higher than the monitors. Another words unless seated at the exact correct height the walls seem to bend at the bezel. Can I correct this with these settings? I didn't think I could but I may be thinking about it all wrong. My seat is in a fairly uncomfortable position and I would like to raise it up without raising the monitors. I will have to play with this tonight and see. Thanks again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the shout out and compliments !  

 

I honestly didn't know this either.. I've always just adjusted the FOV with the seat forward/back & up/down keys.  Will have to try this myself !

 

Does this have to be done for every car ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes it does Darin, which is a bit of a pain but worth the hassle.  I have a cockpit camera per car for triples and one per car for DK2.

 

Before iRacing added the cockpit camera editor tool it was always a bit of a compromise, but now at least you can ensure your POV is perfect for every car.

 

iRacing could have really implemented this all a little better in the UI, instead they simply bolted on this feature over the existing FOV shortcut features without making it easy for a newcomer to understand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

One question I have that you may be able to answer is that. (actually you may have answered above but I haven't gotten home to test yet) I have got my seat extremely close to the ground because because raising it up at all causes an angle change to my eye between the center and outside monitors. I see this particularly with the walls on the outside of the track. If i raise my head up it gets worse and if I lower my head it levels out and then gets worse in the other direction when it gets to far. A 

 

 

This is where you simply change the FOV horizon as mentioned in my post above to match your own eye line and this should improve things. So use the shift + ] or shift + [ to move the horizon up or down while looking straight ahead.  If you do this while running a replay in cockpit view you should see the distortion decrease or increase as you use the shortcut keys.  

 

http://faq.iracing.com/article.php?id=161

 

Also try increasing or decreasing the screen angle setting in the FOV calculator to see if that improves things. You might also want to play around with the P setting too in the camera editor tool if your seat and/or monitors are higher or lower than normal.

 

Edit: I really only got a grasp of all of this by reading posts by David Tucker, so when you are on the iRacing forums I'd advise everyone to read all of his posts because he really does offer some invaluable information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to add...

 

 

When you adjust your seat per car, also make sure to set your mic gain along with it, and then save.

 

That way your cockpit volume will also be set.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to add...

 

 

When you adjust your seat per car, also make sure to set your mic gain along with it, and then save.

 

That way your cockpit volume will also be set.

 

 

Nice one, I didn't know that :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to add...

 

 

When you adjust your seat per car, also make sure to set your mic gain along with it, and then save.

 

That way your cockpit volume will also be set.

What do you do to the Mic gain? How do you set it up?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow this is amazing. After getting triple last week I was disappointed with the low FOV of 125 iracing gave me so I upped it slightly to 140 to give me more view out the sides. Ive now been able to drop my FOV back down to the correct 125 and barely lose any view from the side of my car! Thanks!

 

I have another question now, what is the recommended FOV for your rear view mirror, I have it set to the max of 140 to let me see as much as possible behind but I'm not sure if there are reasons to set it lower since it defaults to 120. The only advantage I can guess at is that with a lower rear view mirror FOV you can judge distance easier but i assume being able to see more beats judging distance when looking out for cars behind?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you do to the Mic gain? How do you set it up?

 

I think you just hit that little button to the left. It is like a little square if i remember correctly. You will see the sliders move around on their own. I'm not sure what this does but I did try it after stated above.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its really up to you. I would prefer to use a realistic rear view setting so that the car that is 1.0 secs behind me doesnt all of a sudden go from a dot to full size in the rear view.

 

In reality I dont use the virtual rear view unless the car has it by default. Once you get used to using your side mirrors and F3 delta, drive your defensive line, you dont really need the extra view IMO. Looking at it is more distracting and takes you off you driving your best lap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow this is amazing. After getting triple last week I was disappointed with the low FOV of 125 iracing gave me so I upped it slightly to 140 to give me more view out the sides. Ive now been able to drop my FOV back down to the correct 125 and barely lose any view from the side of my car! Thanks!

 

I have another question now, what is the recommended FOV for your rear view mirror, I have it set to the max of 140 to let me see as much as possible behind but I'm not sure if there are reasons to set it lower since it defaults to 120. The only advantage I can guess at is that with a lower rear view mirror FOV you can judge distance easier but i assume being able to see more beats judging distance when looking out for cars behind?

 

I am glad this helped you! As for the rear view I'm not sure about that one. Maybe one of these other guys can point you in the right direction on that. For myself I hardly ever look at it. I found that looking in the rear view even for a glance distracts me from concentrating on what is coming up in front of me. So it effected my lap times. I just drive looking forward and had to learn to trust the people behind me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well judging from two similar replies I guess I'm doing it wrong lol, I'm always nervous with someone behind me so I tend to look at it a lot as I'm fairly new and don't wanna wreck someone's race by not realising they're making a move.  I'll learn to take less notice of it! Thanks.

 

On a side note this sim racing thing is addictive! 2 months ago I hadn't even heard of iracing and thought forza was as realistic as it got! Now ive got a full setup with triple screens and forza feels like an arcade game lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doesn't really matter what you set the mirror FOV to it's personal preference, although it will affect your FPS.  For example If you set it to a lower value like 45 you can save some FPS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites