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Clutch technique HELP!

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Ok so I have a couple of questions about clutching, double clutching and slipping the clutch for braking, down changes and up changes.

I got my CSR and elite pedals with an h- pattern now I'm getting used to the wheel and how it feels (well starting to anyway).

When I watch my replay to see where I need to improve with controll I have noticed that my clutching and slamming the gear home is costing me time both on up and down changes.

I was hoping someone on here could help me out (left foot braking by the way) I was told that rather than slamming the gear home on full clutch in if I slip the clutch and change the gear it's faster and smoother but I just keep trashing the box.

Any tips would be stellar lol.

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Left foot braking but you use the clutch? So when using the clutch you brake with your right foot I assume. Upshifting so be fairly easy just sync when you push the clutch in with your gear change action.

When you downshift either slow down a lot before changing gears which will avoid you locking the tires also avoid at all costs jumping from 5th to 2nd for example or ideally you heel and toe so when you push the clutch in (while on the brakes) blip the throttle on each downshift to sync the gearbox speed with your engine speed.

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To clarify, if I understand you correctly, you're using your left foot to both brake and operate the clutch?

You can left-foot brake ONLY while using a sequential transmission (without a manual clutch).

If you are using a manual clutch, you're left foot should ONLY be operating the clutch pedal, and nothing else... Unless you're doing some very advanced pedal work, which I wouldn't attempt right now.

As you approach a turn, You need to move your right foot from the throttle to the brake pedal to decelerate the car to the ideal speed for entering the turn. As you decelerate, you will need to operate the clutch pedal (with your left foot) and the shift-stick, at the correct time for each shift to match the engine RPMs.

Ideally, you're decelerating and "handling" the car with both the brakes and the transmission. Primarily the brakes, but your shifting is a big part of it--and all this often happens at the same time.

Exactly when you brake and shift depends on the turn, the drivetrain of the car (front, rear, 4WD), and how the car is set up.

For MOST turns, any deceleration should be complete just as you're turning in. At that time you need to be in the ideal gear, or one shift away, so you can begin to regulate the throttle to control the car through the entry of the turn, and if you're on the optimal driving line, you can increase the throttle before you hit the apex of the turn (even full depending on the turn and car) to take an optimal exit line out of turn that takes you to the outside of the track.

Remember it's okay to get some of the kerb or rumble strip as long as two wheels stay inside the white line, and it doesn't affect the handling or performance of the car, and your lap time.

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Yeah I left foot brake naturally. Heel toe is a little out of my reach at the moment. I knew about blipping the throttle on the down shift to match rpm which prevents torque locking. I just wondered if there were any other techniques I could look at.

The advice so far has been fairly helpful.

(I miss a gear on my downshifts 5-n-3 (n being the second clutch stage with a blip of throttle) I try to use as much of the engine brake as I can so I can brake later and harder. I'm struggling to build confidence in the cars at the moment, having gone through the stage of loosing the car on camber changes... Something that took longer than expected.

My current baking pattern for hard braking (brake, lift, clutch, neutral, clutch, blip, skip a gear, brake)

Upshift pattern (throttle, lift, neutral, clutch, change, throttle) nice and smooth rpm gets matched perfectly almost every time but it seems to take for ever compared to the paddles.

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Do you have a drivers license?

If so, the car has manual or auto transmission?

What you need to do to shift in a car is, let go of the throtle, almost at the same time, press the clutch fully and change the gear and let go of the clutch and giving throtle at the same time.

You need to do 2 step at a time, and all this should take a second or less.

Hope it helped.

Cheers :)

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This is a very old video of myself using the "clunky" clutch in Gran Turismo 5. Forza 4's clutch is much better, but this gives you an idea...

 

Just note that the real Audi has a sequential transmission (no manual clutch) but this is for demo purposes only.

 

The foot-pedal section of the video does get out of sync some as the video progresses.

 

Not sure why I get so "casual" while driving in a simulator--I'd never let my hand rest on the shift stick for so long while driving a real car.

 

Another thing to note, after doing a lot of F1 driving, my style has changed some, where I "power" through the turns more now than I did back then.

 

http://youtu.be/w6dbXpP6mj8

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Yeah I left foot brake naturally. Heel toe is a little out of my reach at the moment. I knew about blipping the throttle on the down shift to match rpm which prevents torque locking. I just wondered if there were any other techniques I could look at.

The advice so far has been fairly helpful.

(I miss a gear on my downshifts 5-n-3 (n being the second clutch stage with a blip of throttle) I try to use as much of the engine brake as I can so I can brake later and harder. I'm struggling to build confidence in the cars at the moment, having gone through the stage of loosing the car on camber changes... Something that took longer than expected.

My current baking pattern for hard braking (brake, lift, clutch, neutral, clutch, blip, skip a gear, brake)

Upshift pattern (throttle, lift, neutral, clutch, change, throttle) nice and smooth rpm gets matched perfectly almost every time but it seems to take for ever compared to the paddles.

In a modern car using the engine braking will not help at all, nearly all the supercars these days have (or an option) carbon ceramic brakes which are much much more effective at slowing down the car than the engine braking.

Even a normal car like a ford focus will have enough stopping power just with the physical brakes, cars with paddle shifters be it a Ferrari or a Fiat will not let you downshift until you have actually slowed down enough for the gear to avoid engine braking. On the Ferrari 458 for example when you go down the gears you just hold the left paddle you don't pull it for each gear and the car decides when to change down the gear ;)

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Nope I don't drive in real life can't afford to (insurance costs me 3 or 4 times what the cars worth. I have had a go in an ex WRC focus with a sequential box which was good fun though.

I'm new to the wheel racing (obviously) so thank you for the advice so far will try some more of it out when I'm back from work. I'll let you know what happens :)

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Left foot braking is a weight transfusing technique. Same as heel+tow. It helps u enter faster, grip more and exit faster. U enter with load on the accelerator to keep it on the edge and use your left foot to control braking/gripping. Like how u take turns, outside, inside, outside. You come on the brake progressively till the apex and then start to come back off them when u come out till you no longer need the technique. And learn how to "rev match" your gears, it's needed more. Good luck.

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