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Too many sims, too many cars, too little time.

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Hi guys.

 

Lately we have seen the merging of sim developers releasing beta's and new cars and tracks at a rate never seen before. Back then when I was starting, there were just GTR2, LFS and rf1. Choices werent hard back then on where to race. Then of course come along iRacing.

I personally love simracing but with the rate (and price) of the stuff being released, its all not justified and underutilised by the amount i spent setting up my rig, and the amount spent paying for the sims. Sure, I can chose which one i want to race but the lure of new iRacing cars, AC betas and GT6....GSC's and even rf1 NSX is too much. How and when do I do all (Which, YES, i want to do ALL)

 

My wish is we shud have just one virtual Spa, and all the devs can try out their physics with their cars on the same track. Just like in the 60s. That wud be just awesome, isnt it?

 

Cheers

 

/rant

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I'd rather there be to many then to little, it just shows that simracing is still a growing hobby and devs obviousley can see that there titles will sell which is always reassuring. Not having time for everything is probably a good thing in the long run you will never get bored and drain the life out of titles ;)

 

CHEERS! :D

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My approach is to stick with what I think is the best title and not waste my time on others until one title comes along that surpasses it.

 

So far iRacing (and Game Stock Car 2013 on iRacing week 13) are the only titles I spend any time on and I'll continue to briefly try out new titles as and when they come along.

 

I think it's great to have so many titles in development, they'll all bring new ideas to the table which is much better than one title dominating the market with little innovation.

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Oooh yeah why pick if and when you can drive them all!

I enjoy seeing the different approached to the same car(s) all enjoyable (or not) in their own way.

The more interesting matter of this problem is that even though the availability of content is enormous at the moment, it does not seem enough for the community as they will aways (the vocal majority) highlight the one car or track that its not there. :D

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I think two ways. First it is good thing we many sims and competition. Second it is very hard to choose which one to play. I like Simbin games and RBR. I have bought others and I have disappointed many times. Do not believe in hype like Public Enemy says. The earlier it starts, the rubbish game comes. Someone thinks another way but I have trusted my instincts. Do not lie to yourself. Do not buy games because others buy them too. If someone says this or that game is good, it is theirs opinion.

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I think I've settled on Assetto Corsa and Gran Turismo 6 for now since they appeal to me the most. I love that there are a lot of choices though. After I platinum GT6, I might add a third to hold me over until PD inevitably releases Spec 2.0.

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I think I've settled on Assetto Corsa and Gran Turismo 6 for now since they appeal to me the most. I love that there are a lot of choices though. After I platinum GT6, I might add a third to hold me over until PD inevitably releases Spec 2.0.

I've also made the same decision but find myself more excited about AC at the moment as it really feels like a full blown sim compared to GT6.

Back in the day sim racing was a nitch genre. It was tough for developers to make money with it unless you had a NASCAR title or a arcade sim on the consoles. Even today I think iRacing is facing the reality that they never reached the peek population they were hoping for. So I worry that the new surge of racing sims will saturate a relatively small audience. This could mean the the sim you like will halt its development and support early leaving you feeling like you chose the wrong one.

I picked AC over rFactor 2 simply because it performs and looks much better on my machine. The biweekly updates didn't hurt either. I hope it turns out to be the right choice.

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What games do you think still exist? for example 5 or 10 years? I think RBR only, because its lifetime is long. What is lifetime of game on these days?

Nascar 2003

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I love the variety and options we have today but I do understand where you're coming from Maranello.

Whenever I purchase a new sim it takes time to tweak my wheel settings, GPU/Nvidia Inspector settings, getting to know the game, keeping up with all of the post on what's hot, how to fix issues, cool things you can add or download etc. etc. That's a lot of information to digest and a lot of practice time to invest!

It's impossible for me to show multiple sims that kinda love, even though I enjoy several different ones. Being an 'expert' at all of them would properly indicate your time is a little too monopolized by racing. lol 

 

That being said I usually pick one that I intend to compete online with and give it the majority of my time. That's not to say I'm always picking the best sim on the market but being involved in a good league with friendly racers is high on my priority list. And of course if I grow weary of that sim, I just start anew with another. :)

Bailey

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I still play GP4 and only started on Nascar 2003 a few months ago and love it wish i could of got hold of it when it was more popular but being in the UK finding it was a problem. I actually play GP4 more then rfactor lots of old titles still have life.

 

CHEERS! :D

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 I think iRacing is facing the reality that they never reached the peek population they were hoping for. So I worry that the new surge of racing sims will saturate a relatively small audience. This could mean the the sim you like will halt its development and support early leaving you feeling like you chose the wrong one.

 

 

I'm not so sure that iRacing would have had the technical infrastructure to support a massive population early on, their comparatively slow and steady approach seems to be working pretty well for them providing they turn a profit each year.  The fact that it's a pay per unit and subscription based business model ensures they'll always get income, it's just down to how well they manage that income.

 

I know I'd be very worried if iRacing spent a fortune on marketing trying to get a larger user base only to f*%k it all up

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There are now two game types which I don't understand: pay per months and early access. What game industry invents next? Money has too big role for playing. Final products are harder than earlier to make complete.

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^ That's the times we live in I'm afraid, as games get more complex the development costs spiral upwards to a point where it's just not sustainable with a standard business model (sell a finished product at a fixed price for a profit)

 

I work closely in the development world (not games) and agile is the direction nearly everyone is going, which involves releasing an unfinished product followed by a steady release of enhancements in a series of short sprints.

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The business model for games and software in general seems to have changed over the past year to one where the product is provided at low cost or free and content is unlocked for more money.  Or, like AC, the software can be purchased in the beta stage of development so you can help fund it's development.  Fundamentally I don't have a real problem with these business models but they can be abused when content is drastically overpriced.   You also run the risk that the developer doesn't follow through on original promises due to the funding falling shorter than they expected.

 

In the iOS tablet gaming world you see a lot of these free to play games abusing the system by making you spend large amounts of real money to advance the game.  In some cases you could spend hundreds of dollars just to unlock the full content of the game.   You need to be really careful as a consumer that you don't get tricked into spending more money than is conventionally expected for a game.  

 

I watched the development of AC for a long time before I decided to support the developer with my early purchase.  I think I made a good decision as I'm very happy with the quality of what they have so far.  I also tried RaceRoom Racing Experience several times over the past year and have always felt like the game seemed doomed as development seems slow with only weak promises of single and multiplayer racing. 

 

Being a little old school I tend to favor games like AC where I know I won't have to make any more purchases to enjoy the full game.  R3E is a free to play game which requires you to spend money to unlock things as you go and no way to test drive the car to know if you are going to like your purchase.   I just feel like I'm getting suckered into spending money regularly forcing me to be too selective on what I buy.

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I like the idea of having all the choices, but I don't think it does much for my driving.  I tend to spend less time on a particular track or car, and that's not how you get fast - in real life or otherwise. 

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The business model for games and software in general seems to have changed over the past year to one where the product is provided at low cost or free and content is unlocked for more money. Or, like AC, the software can be purchased in the beta stage of development so you can help fund it's development. Fundamentally I don't have a real problem with these business models but they can be abused when content is drastically overpriced. You also run the risk that the developer doesn't follow through on original promises due to the funding falling shorter than they expected.

In the iOS tablet gaming world you see a lot of these free to play games abusing the system by making you spend large amounts of real money to advance the game. In some cases you could spend hundreds of dollars just to unlock the full content of the game. You need to be really careful as a consumer that you don't get tricked into spending more money than is conventionally expected for a game.

I watched the development of AC for a long time before I decided to support the developer with my early purchase. I think I made a good decision as I'm very happy with the quality of what they have so far. I also tried RaceRoom Racing Experience several times over the past year and have always felt like the game seemed doomed as development seems slow with only weak promises of single and multiplayer racing.

Being a little old school I tend to favor games like AC where I know I won't have to make any more purchases to enjoy the full game. R3E is a free to play game which requires you to spend money to unlock things as you go and no way to test drive the car to know if you are going to like your purchase. I just feel like I'm getting suckered into spending money regularly forcing me to be too selective on what I buy.

I agree with you. There are three words: tricked, promised and forced. They represent the way where we are going to. Also represented hidden marketing, buy and enjoy. I don't have to say what it is, everyone can think about it as the way he/she wants. Quite nuts. Do I have to be married with game industry? Mother...I don't want her :D

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