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Thrustmaster TX Racing Wheel & T3PA Pedals First Images + Unboxing Vid

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No but they only shiped to like 4 europen contrys.

 

I´v maild them tho and asked so will se.

 

 /Niklas

at checkout, select verzenden buiten nederland (eu) then the 2nd overboeking (its sepa bank transfer) and last is zweden ;>

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I don't have an official quote from TM.. but.. I would bet money it's partially because of licensing. If there's not a clutch in a 458, they're won't be on a pedal set that TM sells as a Ferrari 458 replica set. Ferrari is a stickler for being exact. I've heard from more than one company in this industry that they are very particular about their brand and how it's portrayed. 

 

Absolutely possible, but even when this guy didn't have a "Ferrari" tie in at E3 and was just the generic "Thrustmaster Prototype" it still only had 2 pedals. Honestly tho, it works out well for either reason. 

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bvbdragon: OK, thank you SOOO much. I thought they ment Hollad...lol.

 

Thanks again. i´m ordering right away!!

 

 /Niklas

 

btw. whats up with this page and quotes?? 

 

EDIT. Now ordered. They sayd it could take weeks for it to ship tho. They didnt know when they was going to get the Wheels.

 

EDIT 2. It looks like the Wheel aint coming befor 2014 for the NL. Someone on Facebook sayd april...

 

EDIT 3. The chat Sayed beginning of next week.

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I'll buy the TX wheel probably too. FM 5 came with some heavy improvements in some areas.

 

But I am not sure about the costs of the shifter and pedals for the tx.

 

Could you test, if the pedals of the T500 work on the TX?

 

I only hope there will be a pedal adapter for the Fanatec CSP...

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Hello,

can anyone test if you can connect the TX to the ps3? I dont't want to buy a second Wheel only for GT6.

 

best regards

 

Yann

 

 

Doubtful.  I'd test it sometime this weekend, but I don't own GT5 and for some reason there doesn't seem to be a demo of either GT5 or GT6 on PSN right now.

 

 

A colleague of mine is curious of this as well. Also wonders if the Fanatec pedals would work with it.

 

Even more doubtful, although theoretically modders could build a conversion box.

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I wouldn't say that they are "foregoing a load cell".. but currently focusing their resources on other projects (this wheel and it's components). :wink:  Just my hunch

A few links that kind of confirm your hunch, that is unless things changed.

 

http://www.morecomputers.com/extra.aspx?pn=2960747

 

You have to dload this in order to read it all

 

http://download1648.mediafire.com/05w7vx9v6xeg/1gaus9sio77izdg/TRS+LoadCell_Realistic+braking+experience.pdf

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Are the T3PA pedals available for pre-order from any retailers yet?  I checked Amazon and they don't have them listed at all yet.

 

:(

 

Neither have I, and boy do I want to.  From about an hour of testing the pedals that come with the TX are actually much better than I was expecting, but I want a clutch and I want a shifter.  :|

 

Hurry up and take my money, Thrustmaster!

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thx for first impressions this early man.  Any chance you ran the wheel on any of the PC sims?  I am not a really console guy my self so Im curious to see what the wheel is like on PC.  

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thx for first impressions this early man.  Any chance you ran the wheel on any of the PC sims?  I am not a really console guy my self so Im curious to see what the wheel is like on PC.  

 

Sorry, no.  

 

I do own a copy of Richard Burns Rally that I barely even played with my Fanatec setup, because the location of my gaming PC has never really been great for setting up the wheel. I have recently moved things around a bit and set my TV up as a second monitor, so whenever I start to tire of Forza I'll probably make another go at getting PC racing set up, but for now I don't really have a great way to test things -- or have much in the way of previous experiences to compare to.

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Doubtful.  I'd test it sometime this weekend, but I don't own GT5 and for some reason there doesn't seem to be a demo of either GT5 or GT6 on PSN right now.

 

 

 

Even more doubtful, although theoretically modders could build a conversion box.

 

 

I was hoping your post would remain in this thread.. I liked it so much that I split it off into it's own topic here http://isrtv.com/forums/topic/10936-thrustmaster-tx-458-italia-community-reviews-and-impressions/

 

Thanks for sharing !!  

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I received my Thrustmaster TX wheel yesterday and streamed the unboxing of it ( www.twitch.tv/FormulaForza ) as well as a second session of actually using it in game. The quick and the short, if you care not to read the detail I'm about to layout below: I'm here to say that the Thrustmaster TX is quite capable; and while reasonably priced, provides an unreasonably good and immersive experience in Forza 5. The wheel is pretty darn good value for the first wheel out of the gate for the Xbox One. My recommendation is that if you have the means of getting this wheel and a way to mount it...DO IT.

 

REASONS FOR PURCHASING AND SURPRIZES

 

Going into the purchase was some knowledge that it had several of the same base components as the widely popular Thrustmaster T500 RS wheel for PC/PS3. After doing a bit more digging, I found that they had switched to brushless motors and a new type of dual belt system that should help the wheel stay quiet while torquing the wheel out of your hands with some impressive force feedback power. The T500 RS had some pretty impressive figures as it touts 150 Nm of torque (that's roughly 110 lbft for us that use imperical units). This is a staggering stat, as it rivals the twisting force of a Mazda Miata's engine.

 

I've had Logitech G25's and G27's, three different offerings of products from Fanatec (911 Turbo S, 911 GT2, CSR Elite). I've stomped on everything from Fanatec's Porsche pedals to their fantastic ClubSport pedals, with the Logitech pedals falling somewhere in between, but well short of the CSP. As far as Thrustmaster went, I'd only played around on a Gran Turismo 5 booth's used and abused T500 RS setup, which was still quite impressive, but I wasn't sure quite how to classify the pedals. They had good construction, but the booth had them inverted, so there was more play in the pedals than I cared for. How then, would the lower cost Thrustmaster possibly compare to the high standards set by Fanatec? There was some reassurance that because Xbox 360 used licensed wheels (XID rather than HID for us wheel geeks), the market for wheels with force feedback was pretty premium. Even Microsoft's own force feedback wheel sold above its sticker price on second hand sites hortly after Microsoft decided to shutter production. Fanatec couldn't produce wheels fast enough, and they sold at or above their asking price as well, depending on the supply. I figured that even if the Thrustmaster TX was utter crap in my eyes there would be a market for me to regain most, if not all of my investment back. I wasn't thrilled that my CSR Elite wheel with Formula rim and ClubSport pedals were now considered obsolete by Microsoft's standards, but I was less thrilled at the prospect of continuing to play Forza 5 with a controller.

 

I took the plunge and ordered the wheel from GameStop.com on Monday November 25th. It pained me to opt for standard 3-5 day shipping, knowing that it still wasn't scheduled to ship until Friday November 29th. I had just accepted that I would be forced to sod on with the controller for another 2 weeks while all my Forza 5 friends would be loving every minute of their new cars and I couldn't focus on anything other than how badly I hate driving with the controller. After seeing a quick note from Darin Gangi (isrtv.com) that all T500RS rims were compatible with the Thrustmaster TX, I also jumped on Amazon and had an F1 wheel rim sent my way (http://www.amazon.com/Thrustmaster-Ferrari-Wheel-PC-Xbox-6304300/dp/B005PPOBQE). To my surprise, both of them arrived MUCH earlier than I expected. By some fluke, my Thrustmaster TX (and apparently several others') had shipped from GameStop before the scheduled release date, and was flagged as next day air. Bonus!

 

UNBOXING AND MORE SURPRIZES

 

When I first unboxed the Thrustmaster TX, the first thing I wanted to know was whether the look and feel would suffice. If it looked and felt cheaply built, I wouldn't waste my time. Luckily the touch points are a reassuring rubberized grip, with solid buttons that do not wobble in their slots. The center hub and top beam of the wheel are made of a harder plastic that leaves me a little less enthusiastic, but truth be told, The Fanatec CSR Elite stock rim had a fair bit of plastic on components that aren't regularly touched. Comparing with the CSR Elite or the 911 GT2, it _looks_ cheaper and more a toy than a tool. This is partly because the CSR Elite hub was made with vast amounts of metal components, giving it a noticably heavier tip on the scale than the hub from the new Thrustmaster TX. Furthermore on the wheel's base, it is covered in nothing but plastic, save a small IR bar that communicates with the kinect for controller recognition. Upon examining the pedals as they came out, more plastic slathered all over my foot interface. The standard two pedal kit is perfectly ok for me to begin with, as I don't use the clutch in the majority of cars I tend to drive (F1, Indy, Prototypes, and other sequentials don't use a clutch for changing gear). The pedal travel felt very nice to my surprise, and was actually on par for feel from the Fanatec CSP v1, had you opted to not fiddle with a pedal spring tuning kit. There is what appears to be a rather thin layer of metal that is placed atop plastic pedal stalks, but it did not flex or bend even when applying my full body weight into the rather wide pedals. I was actually quite pleased with the feel of everything. However, other than the rather accurately replicated 7/10ths scale Ferrari 458 Italia rim, I was a tad underwhelmed at the look as I glanced over at my full metal pedals and mostly metal wheel hub and rim from Fanatec. To be honest at this stage, I was a little surprised that I was liking the setup as much as I was, despite the miles of plastic in front of me.

 

MOUNTING, UPDATING, RACING

 

After removing the Fanatec hardware from my Playseat F1 rig, I shed a quick tear and started mounting the new Thustmaster gear with some earnest excitement. The CSR Elite was fastened to my wheel platform via 4 M6 bolts coming up through the underside of the wheel base. For further rigidity I had used loctite to ensure that it wouldn't wriggle loose on its own. It can totally kill the immersion if you feel something slip or wobble while you are racing what is supposed to be a rigid car. Lining up the holes on the Thrustmaster TX, it was a perfect fit for the wheel base plate on my Playseat, which couldn't be said when I mounted the CSR Elite to it. The only thing that's left to say about the base mounting is that it is held in place by only 2 M6 bolts, rather than 4. Mounting the pedals was a different matter though. The holes didn't line up at all, and even if I tried to offset the pedals using existing holes, I'd still need to drill one, and they would be far too low or high, so both holes would need to be drilled. I just measured and drilled myself, but later found a printable template via the Thrustmaster support site (http://ts.thrustmaster.com/download/accessories/Manuals/TXRW/TXRW_2%20Pedals_Template.pdf). Hole centers were 8.5 inches (precisely 8.30", but for me, 8.5" worked out just fine) down of the toe-end of the pedals, and were 8 inches apart. After drilling out the two holes, pedals fit snugly and with the multitude of rubber grip pads on the bottom of the Thrustmaster TX pedals, I was confident that everything was going to remain rigid. I quickly appreciated the "quick release" system Thrustmaster has. Albeit not what you would normally think of quick release, it is not a pull-and-unlock flange like is on the PC only Fanatec CSW. I'd argue that it is not really "quick" at all, but it doesn't take that long, and I can tell that the system is going to be much better than the double grub screw method on the CSR Elite for changing wheel rims, not to mention Fanatec themselves said not to swap the wheel rims too many times because the connectors would become worn out. The Thrustmaster quick release system is a plastic large thread system with a retaining screw when its all tightened up. The threads appear impossible to cross thread, as they are a half inch wide and ultimately are guiding two PS2 connectors together, so I'm not worried about switching up the wheel rims often. The process does require a phillips screwdriver to loosen the retaining screw, but I swapped wheels three different times last night, and I'm sure the process took less than 30 seconds after I had disconnected the wheel as a controller from the Xbox One.

 

During my twitch stream of the unboxing, several viewers commented that the wheel REQUIRED a firmware update before connecting to the Xbox One, so I went over to the Thrustmaster support page for drivers and the V45 firmware update (http://ts.thrustmaster.com/eng/index.php?pg=view_files&gid=12&fid=83&pid=366&cid=15). The process was pretty painless, as I was careful not to connect the USB to the computer until prompted. Once the drivers were loaded and the firmware updated, there's a Thrustmaster control panel app that let me set the degrees of rotation from 40 to 900, as well as verify all my pedals, paddles, and buttons were working properly. It also had a nifty feature for testing some programmed scenarios (such as tire puncture, blown engine, gearbox failure, boost engaged, collisions, and several more) that incorporate the different methods of feedback: force feedback, vibration, and centering spring forces. It was here that my eyes were opened to just how powerful the Thrustmaster TX is. The very first scenario torqued the wheel right out of my hands. That has _never_ happened on my CSR Elite, even after adding the lighter formula rim to it. Shortly after is where I found the master force feedback potentiometer, and promptly dialed it back to 75%. I was very impressed at the wheel's ability to go from no force to instant and heavy forces. Most other wheels I've owned or driven need ramp up time, but perhaps this is due to their new brushless motors or their improved dual belt system that touts them as being "frictionless". I doubt the physics of that statement, but something they've done is very right.

 

I then unhooked the wheel from the PC, eager to get into Forza 5 and say goodbye to the controller once again. The important thing to note here is that you should not have any gamepad connected and active to the Xbox One when you plug in the USB to the Xbox One. There are some documented oddities that can happen if a gamepad is active when the wheel comes online with the Xbox One, which are apparently being squashed in a mid-december update from Turn 10. Either way, the problem has a work around if you find yourself with this problem, and the solution is documented in Thrustmaster's support area (http://ts.thrustmaster.com/faqs/eng/thr_eng_00142.pdf). When I plugged in the USB for the wheel into the Xbox One, the wheel whirred through a roughly 5 second calibration cycle which is quite similar to how Fanatec products power on. After the xbox light illuminated on the wheel, I could simply use the wheel as a controller. It was fantastic. I got into my first free play to test out the wheel on an F1 car (using the buy/rental bug) that would put the force feedback through its paces and picked a grippy circuit: Circuit de Catalunya. It was fantastic. I forgot entirely about the acres of plastic as it was now only down to feel while I concentrated on not making myself look like a fool on the live twitch stream. The 210 degrees of rotation i set in the driver _did_ apply to the limits of the wheel stops in Forza 5, and you can witness that in the stream. Its not clear whether my force feedback settings carried over, but I'll know more as I use the wheel more. The paddles have a distinct and positive click when you upshift or downshift that feels really sturdy, but falls just short of being better than the CSR Elite stock rim-- which has the best shifters I've ever driven, even better than my formula rim for the same wheel. The more laps I did, the smoother I got, but quickly realized a feature I would miss from the Fanatec ClubSport pedals: the brake potentiometer. In Forza 4, I could eek out every last drop of braking potential from the car by jacking the brake pressure to around 180, but lowering the potentiometer dial to around 80%. For those that aren't familiar, this means that even if I were to fully depress the brake pedal, it would only send 80% signal to the game. All this being said, the pedals were my primary concern and they didn't disappoint, and felt on par with the feel of the Fanatec CSP v1, even if they weren't as clever or as beautiful. The throttle is a touch too stiff for me, but it would be only a matter of opening them to replace a spring to make it feel similar to the CSP's smooth and easy throttle. One interesting omission I saw was that the wheel doesn't have a chat port anywhere on it. Perhaps I've overlooked it and someone can correct me, but it looks like you'll have to use kinect chat for your microphone if you want to talk while using the wheel. This isn't anything new to me though. The chat on Fanatec products in the past was generally so bad that it wasn't used, largely because of a Microsoft component that controlled the chat. One other thing to note is that the Engine Start button works as an 8 direction D pad, so don't fret over navigating menus with a wheel, but don't expect to paint your cars with a wheel.

 

Lets excuse the fact that I can't stand driving with a gamepad, and that I'm completely hopeless with it...In a matter of a couple hours, I went from feeling like a total noob again and struggling to keep up with only above average or highly skilled AI, I was now getting top 10 times (7th in fact, during the stream, and several more top 10 after), but more importantly, I was back in love with driving Forza. Perhaps I'd have this same feeling if the Mad Catz had released first, but the Thrustmaster appealed to me more anyway, and here's why: the Thrustmaster TX has proven internals from the T500 RS, already available two different wheel rim choices (Ferrari F1 or Ferrari GT), and planned three pedal set (Thrustmaster T3PA) and 8 pattern shifter with sequential option (Thrustmaster TH8A). Mad Catz looked enticing with its more metal construction and what look to be finer materials (suede wrapped wheel rim), but its unproven, could be all-show-no-go, and also not out for several months, while a perfectly acceptable option is already here, bringing the joy back to Forza 5 for me.

 

BOTTOMLINE

 

Looks: 6/10 (Pros: smaller than T500 RS, rims really look good | Cons: Plastic everywhere, pedals look especially cheap)

 

Feel: 9/10 (Pros: incredible ergonomics, powerful force feedback, responsive pedals | Cons: no analog stick limits what features you can do )

 

Value: 10/10 -- I can't imagine making what they have packaged for any cheaper. If they used more premium materials rather than plastic, this unit either wouldn't function as well as it does, or it would have a price point more in line with Fanatec CSR Elite ($500) + CSP ($200)

 

I really enjoyed the Thrustmaster TX, and I'm confident I made the right choice between this and waiting for the Mad Catz. The real quandry will be what will I do if an adapter comes out that allows the Fanatec to work on the XB1...which says a lot that I'm even debating it.

 

My current setup:
Vizio 55" LED LCD (1080p 240hz), LG 27" LED LCD monitor
[Chassis] Playseat F1
[Wheel] Thrustmaster TX - currently with the stock 458 rim attached
[Pedals] Thrustmaster TX stock pedals
[Motion] Buttkicker Gamer2 (vibration subwoofer, mounted under the seat)
[Audio] Tritton Warhead headphones (...kinect chat, for now)
[Capture] Hauppauge HD PVR2 (for layered streaming and local recording)
[software] XSplit / FFsplit, Hauppauge Capture
[Mic] Avantone CK-1 omnidirectional pencil mic w/ hyper cardioid element and Blue pop filter running through Shure XLR-to-USB adapter

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Doubtful.  I'd test it sometime this weekend, but I don't own GT5 and for some reason there doesn't seem to be a demo of either GT5 or GT6 on PSN right now.

 

 

 

Even more doubtful, although theoretically modders could build a conversion box.

 

 

Doesn't PS3 use PC wheels? If that is the case I thought this would work. I don't have a PS3 so I don't know for sure what works or doesn't. Don't know anybody has an answer to that or not.

 

I am referring to the PS3, not the PS4. I know even less about the 4 then I do the 3 if that is even possible...

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Does it feel as smooth as the csr elite? I have both and I feel as though the csr elite is a little smoother. I have not played with the thrustmaster yet, still hooking it up.

 

 

At any rate, my csr elite and csp v1 are for sale now. :)

 

 

Man, I look over at my all metal wheel and pedals from fanatec and feel like im downgrading, but I havent played yet. The fact you are this impressed makes me feel a bit better.

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Doesn't PS3 use PC wheels? If that is the case I thought this would work. I don't have a PS3 so I don't know for sure what works or doesn't. Don't know anybody has an answer to that or not.

 

I am referring to the PS3, not the PS4. I know even less about the 4 then I do the 3 if that is even possible...

 

Oficially PS3 used the Logitech DFGT, the T500RS and a Hori wheel I've never seen. Unofficially, it seems like alot of devs put in generic USB wheel support, although the Thrustmaster wheels use something a little different.

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