Avenga76

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Everything posted by Avenga76

  1. Hi guys. I have been lucky enough to be one of the beta testers for the upcoming G-Belts from SimXperience. I have been testing the G-belts for the last 5 months and I would love to share my impressions and feedback with all of you. 1. Overall impressions I have always been a big fan of belt tensioners in Sim Racing. Many years ago I built my own passive system, which just used springs and the motion of the seat mover to give you a sense of braking. While this did give you some feedback, it was never very direct or powerful. So, when I saw that SimXperience was doing a dual axis active belt tensioner then I could really see the potential for it to be great. Having the rest of the SimXperience ecosystem I jumped at the chance to test out the latest addition to their ever-increasing range of motion devices. First time out on the track you are immediately hit by the extra layer of immersion that the belts give you. From the first corner when you feel your shoulders and chest being pulled tightly by the harnesses. Back in the day I used to race my classic Hillman Avenger, and I still do track days in my V8 Avenger wagon. This gives you the same feeling you get when you are hard braking into a corner. As braking is one of the most important areas of Sim Racing, naturally this is where the G-Belts shine. Being able to feel exactly how hard you are braking is so important when you are Sim Racing, and this is exactly what feedback the belts give you. You can feel the pressure of the belts increase as you brake harder, and the moment you lock up you feel the belts ease up as the G forces drop when you start to slide. This alone for me is worth the price of admission. It makes it a must have for fans of immersion, or just anyone looking to get more feedback in to what the car is doing under braking. Some of the other effects it adds also brings a lot of immersion to the Sim, going through the carousel or along the back straight at Nordsclife, you really feel every bump as the belts ever so slightly tighten and loosen. Which also brings me to another point that some people might wonder about. When I say the belts tighten and loosen, they don’t get so loose that they feel like they are falling off- it is more of a pressure sensation. When you get in the rig, you do the belts up tight like you would in a normal race car, and as the belts tighten then it feels like you are moving forward into the belts under braking. It is probably the most unimpressive motion system to watch as a third person because you don’t see much happening, much like the GS-5 where everything is happening under the surface. But when you feel that pressure, my god does it throw me right back in to my old racing days. With Sim Commander’s new cloud tuning, the tuning for each car takes zero effort- just leave cloud tuning on and it is perfectly set up for any car you drive. Since cloud tuning was implemented, I haven’t had to change one setting on the G-Belts, or any of my SimXperience gear, it just works. 2. Packaging Because I was one of the beta testers I am not sure if this is any indication of how the final retail packaging will look but it came well packaged. It came with the controller box, USB power cable, USA power cable, short power cable with a switch, SimXperience badge (This comes separately depending how you are going to orient your G-Belt, on the seat or below the seat) and finally the G-Belt unit itself. The Box... All nicely bubble wrapped The controller box and power cables The G-Belt unit itself A close up of the G-Belt 3. The motors The motors are the same beefy motors that are used in the GS-5. The motors are a high torque Nema 23 SM57HT82-3004 stepper motors which clock in at a massive 1.2kg each, without the gearboxes. This give them tons of torque, and great detail. For scale 4. Mechanism The mechanism uses an arm which is directly attached to the end of the gearbox that pulls the belts back. 5. Installation Installation was easy, just two bolts holds the G-Belts to the back of the seat, then you just feed the harness through based on the diagram on the SimXperience website. This will differ depending how you have mounted the G-belt. The G-Belt unit is really heavy, so the hardest bit was lifting it while you bolt it in. I did it by myself, but it might be easier if you get someone to screw the bolts in while you hold it against the back of the seat. The mounting holes I coiled my excess harness under the G-Belt 6. Power and torque Using such large motors, it really can put the squeeze on you, quite literally. I remember back when I used to race, I would feel quite sore in the shoulders after a race, with the G-Belts turned up to the max you can definitely replicate that feeling. If you don’t want such a workout then you can turn them down. I don’t think you would want any more powerful, unless you were a masochist, or you know a good masseuse. 7. Detail Again, using such big motors they are able to reproduce all the fine details in all the bumps and surges. You can really feel just how hard you are braking and how the car is responding under you. This is a real game changer when it comes to braking. The dual axis really helps here also. having the ability to tighten each belt independently means that it feel like you are being pushed sideways around the corners. Adds that extra layer over a single axis system. 8. Build quality and robustness As with all the SimXperience gear, this is built like a tank. I can’t feel any flex in the system. I have been using it extensively over the last 5 months and it hasn’t skipped a beat. 9. The comfort If you have the strength turned up too high, then you definitely can make it feel uncomfortable, but if you are used to race harnesses and real race cars, then the same is true for them. But if you don’t go too overboard then they are comfortable. I use 3” belts which do a good job of spreading the load out. I use a 5 point harness which I thoroughly recommend. You really need that submarine strap to stop the belts riding up under braking, so I wouldn’t recommend 4 point. During the beta, there was some people who modified their 5 point belts to become 3 points, just the shoulders and the submarine. I tried this myself, but it didn’t work for my body type so I stuck with the full 5 point as it pulled the belts tight against my chest. 10. The feeling of G forces This is where the G-Belts shine. The feeling of the braking G Forces is what this system is all about and it does an amazing job of it. As I have said previously, the extra added feedback you get under braking is a game changer. There is an effect to loosen the belts under acceleration, but I didn’t find that as useful because you don’t really get much feedback through the belts in real life under acceleration. I find the GS-5, full motion or wind simulators do a better job of acceleration effects, but if it is the only form of motion you have then it does give you some sense of acceleration. The dual axis motors do also give you a good sense of lateral G forces, especially when combined with other motion systems. 11. Road bumps Road bumps is an interesting one. At first, I didn’t really like them, but as I got used to them then it felt more and more natural. They work really well in addition to other motion, but if it is stand alone then at first they stand out a little bit too much. If you are using it stand alone, and you do find the road bumps too distracting, then turn them down and slowly increase them until they feel normal. 12. The feeling both as a standalone and to compliment an existing motion simulator As my first test I wanted to test it with one of my existing profiles so I picked the F3 car in iRacing with cloud tuning turned on I wanted to test it with all my other motion enabled so it was closest to the setup that I'm used to running. I am used to running a passive belt tensioning system with springs pulling against the movement of the Stage 4 seats, so I am used to having some feedback when braking from the belts, but with the G-Belts it was next level. After the first corner I loved it. They work so well with the rest of the SimXperience products, you feel the panels and the belts working in unison, each adding a different element of the G-forces to you. My next test was to break it down to just the G-Belts and then added other motion devices in one by one. Here are my experiences. G-Belts only With only the G-Belts, the feeling of braking and cornering was really good, you could instantly tell how hard you were braking, which given how important braking is, is quite invaluable. I found that some of the bumps didn't feel that natural with no other feedback from the seat below. The braking in to corners still felt amazing. but without the GS-5 to fill in the rest then the road bumps felt a little odd. If I were to run it with G-Belts only then I would probably turn down the bumps a little, but as I was planning to add in the rest of the motion, I left the settings where they were. I think with some minor tweaking then you could get it to be a good standalone motion addon, but in a different way to the GS-5 or Stage 4 alone. As a standalone unit then braking is where the G-Belts shine, if braking is the most important thing for you then the G-Belts would be a great addition, but they don’t do as much for cornering as the GS-5 or Stage 4 would. But then it is a very cost effective way to get your foot in the door in motion without shelling out for a GS-5 or Stage 4. I guess I am a bit spoilt in that regard. But don't get me wrong, it is awesome standalone, and it gets even better when paired with the other motion systems. G-Belts plus GS-5 These two work really well together. It totally fixes my problems with the bumps on the G-Belts because now you are feeling the bumps in the GS-5 and the G-Belts so it does feel like you are actually getting bumped around in the seat. Cornering G-forces feel great because you have the panels and the belts working together. And the braking is even better because not only do you have the pressure from the belts, you also have the pressure from the panels under your legs. G-Belts plus GS-5 plus Stage 4 This is when the magic happens. They all work so well together so you get all of the motion cues combining harmoniously. Truly amazing. I understand that this type of setup is out of the reach of most people, and I am very fortunate to have 2 full motion rigs. I think any motion is a great addition to your rig, and with the SimXperience ecosystem it all works so well together. I don’t think you can really go wrong with any of the SimXperience motion options. Now as another test I wanted to go the other way and turn off the G-belts after I was used to them. GS-5 plus Stage 4 with No G-Belts This is where things got really interesting. After running some laps with everything on and then switching the G-Belts off then I found I was missing my braking on corners, locking up, all sorts of horrible stuff. It is amazing how quickly you come to rely on the feedback from the G-Belts, you can tell exactly how hard you are braking, and when you are going to lock up, just like in a real car. So when you just switch it off when you are used to it then your brain sort of panics because it isn't getting that feedback, it was almost like my brain was telling me to brake harder because I couldn't feel the pressure from the G-belts, and subconsciously my brain interpreted that as I wasn't braking hard enough. Which is really odd, because I didn't feel that as much going the other way, when I switched off the motion and GS-5. It really shows how valuable braking feedback is and how much we rely on it, more so than cornering G forces I would say. Zero motion or G-Belts. Man, this was painful. It’s like I had a limb cut off. With no feedback from the car at all then I felt so disconnected from what was happening in my VR headset (As a total torture test I went back to no motion or VR and I couldn’t drive at all!!) 13. A brief comparison to the passive belt tensioners and what it has improved on. My old spring based setup gave me some feedback, but it was so indirect, because it was relying on the movement of the seat then being transferred through the belts. It was like hearing about the braking in the third person. With an active setup then the feedback is so much more powerful and direct. I watched a Youtube video of an old 1996 Thrustmaster wheel that used a bungie cord, and the passive system was sort of like that. The G-belts, on the other hand, are like a direct drive wheel… for your shoulders. My old system 14. Looks I love the looks. It has that classic SimXperience aesthetic. The cut out G-Belt logo with the brushed aluminium insert looks amazing. And the chrome SimXperience logo looks like it would be at home on one of my classic cars. 15. Controller box This is the classic SimXperience controller box. The same as the GS-5, Stage X and Accuforce. This means I now have 4 of these big controller boxes, and they do take up quite a lot of space by the time you have 4 of them. 1 or 2 isn’t bad, but I do wish you could consolidate them down into less boxes. 16. Noise Other than the fan in the controller box, it is pretty quiet. Just a little servo squeak here and there 17. Sim Commander SimCommander has improved greatly over the last few months with the addition of cloud tuning. This means you can just tick a box and it will automatically download the best tune for that car and track combo from the cloud. No more manually setting up each car or dealing with lots of profiles. You can still go in and tweak settings if you like, but since cloud tune was released, I have just been using cloud tune. 19. compatibility with other seats. If you have a hard backed seat then there is a template you can use. You just need to line it up with the cut out for your belts and then drill two holes. If you don’t have a seat that would work for drilling in to then they make a universal mount which bolts on underneath any standard seat, so you can retrofit pretty much any rig out there that uses a racing style seat. The template on a GS-4 The Universal seat mount 18. Summary I really loved the added effects that the G-Belts add to my existing rig. It looks amazing and the install was simple and easy. With how important braking is then I think it would be good as a standalone addition to a static rig. And for those who already have motion, then it is an essential addition to any motion system. Overall, 10/10 Love it. Especially with all of the other SimXperience hardware working together. I love that it does feel very different from car to car, depending on how quickly and sharply they brake. You can really feel it in a big heavy car that is quite lumbering under brakes, versus a high downforce light car which is super fast on the brakes. It is also amazing how quickly you learn to rely on it. You can instantly tell exactly how hard you are braking and then you learn how hard you can brake in that particular car. I think that is where the true power of the G-Belts is, and that is true even as a standalone system. And because braking is probably the most important part of racing, then by proxy it makes the G-belts one of the most important motion systems. Also, my cat very much approves of the G-belts
  2. Thanks, You're welcome. I hope it is helpful. I tried to cover all the combos I have here.
  3. Avenga76

    My DIY Wind Simulator

    Hi Guys, I just thought I would share my latest DIY project. It is a wind simulator that will vary the amount of wind based on the speed of the car. ***EDIT*** I am now selling complete wind simulators and kitsets here http://www.isrtv.com/forums/topic/23623-complete-wind-simulators-and-kitsets-for-sale/ They are available in a fully assembled unit Partially assembled unit (Just add blowers) Mini version (Just add blowers) Assembled controller boxes Or kitset ***Edit 2*** This project is compatible with iRacing Fanboi V2 and it is the easiest way to control the blowers in iRacing http://members.iracing.com/jforum/posts/list/3505953.page ***Edit 3*** I have also finished my personal wind simulator ***Original post*** It is built using an Arduino Uno with a Monster Moto shield. It runs off Sim Tools which also runs my DIY motion and it works with any game that outputs the speed telemetry, so it works with iRacing, Dirt Rally, PCars, Assetto Corsa, No limits roller coaster, AMS and tons of other sims. The Arduino code was written by SilentChill over at the Xsimulator forums and you can find it here https://www.xsimulator.net/community/threads/simulated-wind-using-monstermoto-and-arduinouno.6876/ I started off with the base components. I am using a pair of Seaflo 4" In-Line blowers. They are 270CFM each, they run on 12V and pull 6A each, For the controllers I am using an Arduino Uno and with a Monster Moto shield. I got them without the header pins attached because I will be used some more of them for an upgrade I have planed for my DIY motion simulator I brought a ton of them so I can also replace the JRK 12V12's in my motion sim with dual Monster Moto's It is really easy to prep the board, just solder the header pins on then wire in the power and fans. If you look on the left side you will see the + and - for the power supply, and on the right side you with see A1 and B1 for the first fan and A2 and B2 for the second fan. The A is positive and the B is negative. The Monster Moto then just plugs in on top of the Arduino After wiring up the first fan I did a quick test to see if it was all working, I have just connected it up to a battery for now. Once I have finished my design I will wire it back to the batteries that power my DIY Simulator. Here is a video of it running with just the one fan in No Limits roller coaster. I have my multi-meter hooked up to the second fan controller so you can see the voltage vary. It uses PWM so it is actually the duty cycle that is changing but my Multi-meter shows it as the voltage changing. Next I made a prototype mount for it, just using some wood and a blank PCB I had laying around The controllers all wired up, you can see the power from the battery at the front of the controller then the power to the fans going out the back of the board. This is the back side of the set up. The fans blow towards the motor on the other side. Here is a quick video of both fans vs a toy car, it reminds me of that Mythbusters episode when they drove a car behind a jet plane I then temporarily mounted the fans on top of my Accuforce. For now while I am testing I have just cable tied a battery up the front of my rig, it is a 9Ah battery so it should be able to run the fans for a couple hours between chargers. It is just secured on with cable ties at the moment. eventually I will make up a mounting plate for them and just run some ducting up. I will also make an enclosure for the controllers Here is a wide angle shot of my rig with the fans installed. It adds a lot to the immersion and it also helps keep you cool. I use the Oculus Rift CV1 so it helps a lot with keeping me cool. It is great for open wheelers and roller coasters.
  4. Hi guys. So, it's finally time to write my review of the GS-5, I have really been looking forward to this one. First up, a bit of background. I have owned my old GS-4 for 4 and a half years, and I have been lucky enough to be able to have the new GS-5 for the last 6 months as one of the alpha testers. Testing the new GS-5 has been really great. I have been putting a lot of miles on it over the last 6 months and I have a lot of great feedback to share with you all. As I have been testing it for so long then this will be quite a lengthy review, so I am going to break it down into little chapters. 1. Overall impressions As a GS-4 owner I really love my GS-4 and I was dying to see what SimXperience came up with for the next version, and I am happy to tell you that they hit it out of the park on this one. They have improved on every aspect that made the GS-4 great and went above and beyond. It performs, looks and feels orders of magnitude better than the old GS-4. Where the GS-4 has an industrial look and feel, the GS-5 feels like such a polished and perfected product. You can finally see why the long wait, you can tell that they wanted to take the DNA of the GS-4 and evolve and perfect it in to the GS-5 2. The Seat in general The seat itself is still a Kirkey seat but instead of going for a custom Series 16 Economy Drag seat like they had on the GS-4, they have stepped it up to a custom Series 47 road race seat. This is a massive step up in both looks and comfort, I will cover the comfort more in its own section. The GS-5 is now a full-on road race seat complete with side supports and shoulder supports, and it has to be one of my favourite seats I have tried, seriously, I was tempted to by a pair for my road car. I think it was a really good move to upgrade to a much nicer seat. 3. The motors The motors have taken a drastic step up in spec. The GS-4 was using 16 small RC servo motors but the GS-5 has upgraded to 4 massive stepper motors with planetary gearboxes. So instead of the 4 small motors per panel that all needed to me synchronised, they have switched over to one big motor per panel. This give you a ton more power and torque, and it feels a lot more direct. It really is like going from something like a G29 up to a Direct Drive wheel, except you have 4 of them in your seat. The motors are a high torque Nema 23 SM57HT82-3004 stepper motors which clock in at a massive 1.2kg each, without the gearboxes Here is a ruler for scale And compared to the GS-4 Servos 4. Mechanism The mechanism for moving the panels has also changed. Before it was just a lever arm and push rods which always looked flimsy to me. They have replaced this with an ingenious cam and roller bearing type arrangement which gives you much smoother movement. It allows for really efficient use of the space under the panels. The little motor pods are pretty much entirely taken up by the motors and the lift mechanism takes up barely any room, this allowed them to put such big motors in. It is quite packed under the panels This is the cam lift mechanism And the bearing that rolls along the cam profile Compared to the old GS-4 lever arm and push rod which looks flimsy. 5. Panels The panels have changed a lot since the GS-4, they are now longer and are curved so they make much better contact with your back and legs. Because of this it doesn't feel like you are sitting on panels like it did with the GS-4, it feels just like a standard seat. A little know feature of the GS-4 was that it had mounting holes for 4 Dayton bass shaker pucks. The GS-5 also has these mounting holes. If anyone is keen on seeing some of these installed on the GS-5 then I will buy a set and do a little review slash how to guide. This is what you have all come for, the first shot of the GS-5 naked. R18 NSFW The mounts for the Dayton bass shaker pucks, who wants to see me install a set? The panels are now curved to match the contours of the seat and your back now Compared to the flat panels of the GS-4 6. Power and torque With the increase in both the motor size and elegant lift mechanism you get an amazing increase in the power and torque of the panels. You can quite literally turn it up to the point where it will legitimately give you sore ribs like you would get driving a shifter kart or something like that. But there is no way you would want to run at that level, but it's good to know it's there if you feel like a bit of a workout. Under normal conditions I like mine reasonably strong, the old GS-4 feels like a gentle press now. Much like with the Accuforce, in SimCommander you can not only auto-tune the seat from recorded laps, or while you drive. They also have power mode settings, like soft, default and extreme. This lets you quickly and easily pick the power level you want. Normally I run the default strength on normal cars, and if it is a really high G-Force car then I will switch it up to extreme, just so I can really feel all that cornering force. 7. Detail As Pirelli says: "Power is nothing without control" and this is certainly true for the GS-5. Going from the GS-4 to the GS-5 this was probably the biggest and most immediate thing I felt. Just the awesome level of detail. Having used the GS-4 for so long I really didn't know what I was missing out on. I actually had to go have a look at the telemetry because I couldn't believe that there was that much bumps and twitches in some of the faster cars. The GS-4 just wasn't fast enough or powerful enough to react in time to recreate all the little bumps going on in the car. Like I said before, it really is like G29 vs DD wheel type feeling. Those guys with DD wheel will know this feeling, but if you remember when you first got your DD wheel and you do a track that you know well, then all of a sudden you start feeling all these bumps that you couldn't feel on the G29, it's like that. Some cars in fact are way too bumpy in real life to me comfortable in my sim. The HPD at Lime Rock was a good example, that thing has like no suspension and when you look at the telemetry it sort of skips and bumps through the corners fluctuating between about 3-4G. I never really noticed it on the GS-4 because it wasn't able to keep up with the rapid changes in G force, but the GS-5 can. I thought, surely something must be wrong, but it turns out that it really is that bumpy in real life, I recorded a video and you can see the car bouncing all over the show. So for really bumpy cars like that, sometimes I add a bit of smoothing just because IRL that car track combo is just too bumpy for me. Most normal cars are fine, and it is this detail that really gives you that feeling of how different each car is. With the GS-4 it just felt like pressure when you turn. But with the GS-5 because you feel all that detail, you can really feel the difference in the car you are driving, the formula Renault feels tight and agile, where the GT3 feels more big and lumbering. You can really feel the weight difference going between cars like this, which is something I never got with the GS-4. Because of this also, auto tuning is really important for each car, so you can tune it for that car so it feels perfect. 8. Build quality and robustness The build quality is outstanding on the GS-5. It really feels like it is a tank, every aspect of it has been over engineered and you can tell how well thought out everything is. One of my biggest worries with the old GS-4 was that it seemed really fragile with those little servo motors and linkages, I used to be a big guy, so I was always worried about bending something or burning out a motor. With the GS-5 I have no worries at all about the robustness of anything, it literally is built like a tank. 9. The comfort I'm not going to lie, the old GS-4 was probably one of the most uncomfortable seats that I have used, but the GS-5 is the complete opposite, it is by far the most comfortable race seat I have ever used, like seriously, I have done 4-hour stints in it and it feels comfy as. The GS-4 literally had no padding at all, where the GS-5 has a ton of padding and it has this nice moulded leg support in between your legs, so your legs sort of fit in to these grooves. It is a slight bit wider than the GS-4. I have sort of also been luckily in that I have been able to test out the GS-5 at a whole range of body sizes. Back when I was using my GS-4 I was 167kg (370lb) which was pushing it for the GS-4, by the time I got my GS-5 I was down to 144kg (320lb) And I could fit nicely in to the GS-5, I continued to test it down to my current weight of 99kg (218lb) and it still feels comfy as, not too roomy, if I put my hands on my hips then they would be touching the side supports. I only have another 14kg (30lb) to go until I am at my target weight, so I will keep reporting in to let you know how the comfort is. That's the kind of quality testing I do, losing 68kg (150lb) just so I can test the seat at different body types for you guys The increased padding in the GS-5 cover, you can see the really large legs and bum support section. Compared the the GS-4 which had no padding, it is just racing on a cloud There are the legs supports from the top. I never thought I needed them but it makes it so comfortable. Compared to the old GS-4 10. The feeling of G forces The feeling of G forces is really the bread and butter of what the GS-5 does, and now with the increased motor size and better lift mechanism, it is able to deliver these G forces in a much stronger and more convincing manner. I used to think my GS-4 was great at G forces but the GS-5 is just next level, you feel every little change in G forces which other motion simulators can't do. Normal motion simulators are great for the initial turn in to a corner, but once you are in that corner then they can’t do anything to replicate that sustained G force pressure, they have already tilted as far as they can, and they can't tilt far enough to replicate the pressure of G force. That is where the GS-5 comes in. It is able to keep applying that pressure throughout the corner, and because of the better specs you can really feel all that detail of what the car is doing mid-corner. 11. Road bumps This was the biggest surprise for me. The GS-4 wasn't that good at road bumps, it could do cornering okay but not road bumps. Now with all the extra power of the GS-5 then it is able to recreate all of those bumps, so much so that it does a better job of road bumps than either of my motion rigs do. Also, in the same category is vertical elevation changes. In the GS-5 these feel amazing, there is a few sections of the nordschleife track where you go down a big dip then up a steep hill, the pressure at the bottom, right when you start to come up feels awesome, it almost feels like you are being crushed down in to the seat as the panels squeeze you, and then as you crest the hill then the panels drop away and you almost feel like this moment of weightlessness. 12. The feeling both as a standalone and to compliment an existing motion simulator One of the really great things about the GS-4/5 is that it can be used as a standalone system, or to enhance an existing motion simulator. I started off with just the GS-4, I brought it in April 2014 and used it standalone until I built my DIY motion rig in 2015. I got my GS-5 back in May 2018 and originally, I used it on my DIY motion rig until I got under the weight limit for the SimXperience Stage 4 motion rig, so now I have the GS-4 on my DIY motion rig and the GS-5 on my Stage 4 motion rig. I did my testing of the GS-5 in a combination of just the GS-5, just the motion, and both combined. As a standalone it is great because G forces are probably the most informative motion queue you get and is probably the one that is going to make you faster, because you can feel exactly what the car is doing mid-corner and under braking. Anyone with a DD wheel or high-end brakes know how important these are, and just like with high end wheels and pedals, you can feel what your car is doing by the feedback you are getting. It also can do a really convincing rear traction loss, normally when you are in a corner then the outside panels will be pressing hard against you, but when you lose traction then they will drop off the pressure as the back starts to come around. You feel that instantly and you are able to react far quicker than you can with just a FFB wheel, in fact most the time I will know I'm stepping out from the seat before the wheel. On the other hand, when you combine it with a full motion simulator, especially a seat mover then it really compliments the strengths and weakness of a full motion rig. Where full motion is really good at is initial turn in, and those big vehicle movements, and where it lacks is mid-corner and sustained G forces, which is exactly where the GS-5 shines the most. So much so that now days, if I turn off my GS-4/5 then my motion just feels wrong, so much so that if you gave me the choice of either full motion or GS-5 then I would pick the GS-5. The funny thing is that before I have been asked that about the GS-4 and my answer was different back then, I would have said full motion over GS-4, but now the GS-5 has tipped it the other way. But because I am spoilt, and I have 2 full motion rigs and 2 GS-4/5's then I don't have to choose they really are the perfect combo. Here is the GS-5 on my old DIY rig 13. A brief comparison to the GS-4 and what it has improved on (Spoiler alert: It has improved everything) If you are interested in a more in-depth breakdown of the differences then I might do a full write-up on of the GS-4 vs GS-5 but as you can probably tell from all the above points, it is pretty night and day. They have taken the GS-4 and improved every single aspect of it, and I have no hesitation whole heartedly recommending this as an upgrade for anyone who has a GS-4, it is that much better (Sorry for hurting the resale rate of your old GS-4) and for anyone who doesn't have a GS-4 then you owe it to yourself to try one, there is nothing else on the market that does what the GS-5 can do. A couple of shots of the GS-5 and the GS-4 side by side 14. Looks I just love the looks of the GS-5. With that murdered out black look, and the carbon fibre GS-5 panels on the back of the motor pods, it is one sexy looking seat. The GS-4 had a very industrial, almost DIY look to it, where the GS-5 looks polished and professional. It is a physically larger seat, due to the bigger headrest and shoulder supports so it does look more impressive on your rig. Some shots of the new motor pods And the beautiful carbon fibre GS-5 logo 15. Controller box With the GS-5 they have switched to a separate controller box, it is the same size and layout as SimXperience use for the SX-4000 on their motion rigs and the AF V1/V2, which is good because they are all the same mounting holes. At the moment I have it just sitting beside my Stage 4, I have the floor boards for the Stage 4 coming next week, so I will mount it to that when it arrives. There is plenty of cable length, so you can mount the controller box where you have room on your rig 16. Noise Anyone who has used a GS-4 will know the buzzing of the RC servo motors. I am happy to say that that is gone now. When stationary there is no sound at all, when you are driving there is some noise, but I can’t hear it at all over my rift headphones, and speakers at normal volume will easily drown out any noise from the motors. 17. Harnesses One recommendation that I feel enhances the GS-5 is to install a set of harnesses, they really pin you down to the seat, so you feel the pressure of the panels squeezing you against the belts just that little bit more. I use a little seat belt tensioning system, but if you have a static rig then you can just hard mount them. 18. Sim Commander Last but not least is SimCommander. As with the Accuforce and SimVibe, this is an incredibly powerful piece of software that allows you to quickly auto-tune your GS-5 but also gives you the power to go in and add extra effects or tweak to your hearts content. Basic tuning is as easy as running a few laps and then auto-tuning off that lap. This will look at what kind of G force your particular car is pulling and then map the panels to match. Much like a wheel, you can get something akin to clipping if you say tune for a low G force car and then drive a high G force car, because it is tuned for a low G force car then it would just feel way to strong on a high G force car. You can create a new profile in a few clicks and also duplicate profiles and tweak them. 19. Summary So, in summary, I can’t really think of anything bad to say about the GS-5, it has easily improved on everything that made the GS-4 great, I can’t wait until the public beta testing starts and then it won’t be long until you guys get a chance to buy one and try it for yourself. The GS-4 has always been one of my favourite bits of Sim Racing hardware, and I am so happy that it is back and better than ever in the GS-5.
  5. Avenga76

    GS-5 Review

    Thanks. I just got a SimXperience Stage 4. I still have my old motion simulator so I have the GS-4 on the DIY 3DOF and the GS-5 on the Stage 4 3DOF. Now that I’ve lost over 70KG I am well under the weight limit of the Stage 4. The DIY rig was designed from when I was really big so it’s a bit overkill now.
  6. Avenga76

    My DIY Wind Simulator

    I agree. Especially since we are selling competing products. I am always willing to help out other Sim racers (even to the detriment of my sales) but we should keep our post seperate. That is why I didn’t post my speed test results in any of your wind simulator threads. If people are looking at my wind simulators and want to see a speed comparison then they can see my testing and see that mine are 4 times more powerful, but I’m not going to go on to your threads and start telling people to buy mine because it is more powerful.
  7. Avenga76

    My DIY Wind Simulator

    Just a quick update. I am now offering the TMC blowers as an official upgrade for my wind simulator. The TMC is about 10-25% more powerful than the Seaflo (depending on range) and 4 times more powerful than the fans that Sim Racing Studio uses on their wind simulator. (And yes you can limit the max fan speed) In my testing I find you get a much better feeling in the difference in wind speed with the faster blowers, you could look at the TMC blowers on my wind simulator like an Accuforce and the SRS wind simulator would be like a G27 compared. Here is a graph comparing the wind speed at 600mm with all fans and no air flow straighteners. Obviously the closer you have the fans, the faster the wind speed, point blank the TMC blowers are 88KPH. Here is the raw data Model Wind Speed in KPH at 600mm TMC 42.64 Seaflo 31.86 Tyhoon 5400RPM 13.24 B Blaster (SRS fan) 12.93 Tyhoon 4250RPM 10.21 Noctua NF-A14 7.24 Noctua NF-F12 1.44 Here is a batch that I am just sending out with TMC blowers
  8. Avenga76

    My DIY Wind Simulator

    Mines 540 CFM, but it's not all about CFM, they had no airflow straightening, so most of the wind will die off before it even gets to you. You get a 60% increase in wind speed at 600mm using airflow straighteners (See my wind speed tests here) http://www.isrtv.com/forums/topic/23623-complete-wind-simulators-and-kitsets-for-sale/?do=findComment&comment=207086 Also they are not using any EMF suppression so the coil whine from the PWM switching in their video is crazy bad. With a few tweaks they could make their system much better. Anywho, as you say, probably a market for both.
  9. Avenga76

    My DIY Wind Simulator

    Here is a link to my kits. They are way more powerful than the Sim Racing Studio ones, but they are also a lot more expensive Fixed the link in the first post also http://www.isrtv.com/forums/topic/23623-complete-wind-simulators-and-kitsets-for-sale/
  10. Avenga76

    My DIY Wind Simulator

    The monster moto just stacks on top of the Arduino like this
  11. Avenga76

    My DIY Wind Simulator

    You could but you would have to write your own Arduino code to use blowers instead of PWM fans. At the moment there is 2 programs that support my wind simulators, the first is iRacing Fanboi that is free but only supports iRacing and the other is SimTools which costs $70 but it supports most common sims. FYI, those PC fan wind simulators are really weak compared to a blower style one. I was thinking of maybe making a low cost version of my big wind simulator just for small PWM fans. It won't give you that much of an effect though. Don't know if it would be worth it. My blowers put out 70-85KPH winds, where the little PC fans drop off almost instantly so you only get a few KPH. I could do some tests if anyone is interested.
  12. I don't have Super Hot but I am liking dead and buried. I still wish the match making was better. I wanted to play some horde last night but I could only find maximum 2 players, I want a good 4 player match. One question, If your are ducting down, do others see that in your player model, because I never see anyone else ducking down behind things. And then is your hit detection box the size of you standing or crouched. I would really love to do some experimenting around with that game.
  13. Yeah. My PC is always on. Give me a yell if you want to set up some games. Space pirate trainer is quite a bit different to dead and buried. I would say dead and buried is more fun because you are down on the floor ducting for cover the whole time. I swear I must look like a total muppet playing VR, I love how you actually feel like you are hiding behind something real in dead and buried. My only problem with dead and buried is that it is a bit hard to find games. First couple of days after I got my touch I couldn't find a single game, now that there is more players it is becoming easier to get matches. Space pirate trainer is single player only. It it waved based but you have a ton of different weapons so it is fun trying different tactics, settings yourself challenges to only uses certain weapons or doing a no shield run, or a dual shock stick melee only run, that type of thing. It is good just to have a quick blast. I usually play quite a few games for a short session in each, so I will do a couple of rounds of Space pirate, then a couple of songs in Audio shield, then a couple of matches of dead and buried and a bit of slashing in Fruit ninja. By that time I am totally worn out so I will do a bit of dicking around with guns in Hot Dogs, Horseshoes & Hand Grenades, in H3VR they have a Christmas advent calendar going on so each day you get to open a new gun.
  14. I am loving my touch also. Audio shield, Fruit Ninja VR and Space Pirate trainer are my favs. Also Hot Dogs, Horseshoes & Hand Grenades is a good "Dicking around with guns simulator" as the developer describes it, just make sure you turn on the Touch controller enhancements. Also Accounting is really good if you like Rick and Morty, plus it is free and really funny I tried Medium and Quill but I don't have an artistic bone in my body. I have about the same space as Sebj, I have 13x10. I have ordered another camera for behind so I can do full 360 room scale. At the moment I have a blind spot for hand tracking directly behind me.
  15. Avenga76

    My DIY Wind Simulator

    Mostly engine vibrations for now. I might add some front suspension or road bumps in to the mix. It works really well. I like the engine vibrations from the transducer better because it is a proper vibration instead of a rotational movement from the Accuforce. I have been so busy with the wind simulator stuff that I haven't had much time to experiment with other effects on the wheel channel of SimVibe.
  16. Avenga76

    My DIY Wind Simulator

    I finally got around to finishing off my own wind simulator. I have been so busy developing my kitset version that I haven't had time to finish my own. I have put in all the tricks and techniques I have learnt over the last 2 months of developing the kitset and I am blown away by the difference now. In my finished version I am getting double the wind speed of my original prototype. When I did my first I was getting about 21KPH, my airflow straighteners boosted that up to about 30KPH, and switching to the TMC blowers and increasing the voltage from 12v up to 13.8v has increased the wind speed up to over 40KPH now. It is a bit of a beast now. I just tried it on my monitor so I could keep an eye on the blowers. Over the weekend I will try it with my rift and full motion this weekend. I mounted my air flow straighteners. I developed a little T Slot style mounting adaptor for my Accuforce so I could mount stuff like my wind simulator and transducer to the top of my Accuforce. It works really really well. If anyone is interested in a pair then I can print them and send them out to you. The frame for the ducts are mounted directly to the top of the wheel and I can adjust the height and angle of the ducts. The ducts come up to about head height The blowers are mounted down behind my wheel and run up beside the wheel
  17. Avenga76

    My DIY Wind Simulator

    Just with a sheet metal brake like this
  18. Avenga76

    My DIY Wind Simulator

    Hey guys. As Darin said on the last episode of TWISR, I have been building a wind simulator for ISRTV and I thought I would share some photos BTW I love these first two photos, done completely in camera using my tiled floor and a Telephoto L series lens I also did some ISRTV branded air straighteners.
  19. Avenga76

    My DIY Wind Simulator

    Another shipment of my boxes and air straighteners ready to go out tomorrow. Back to my own wind simulator. Finished the mounting of my TMC blowers and controller box, finished the last bit of tidying the wires. still need to run the ducting Connected up my USB hub to the bottom of the firewall where my blowers are mounted. Wired the wind simulator back to my battery bank Just using piggy back terminals to connect everything. Connected up a 25A inline blade fuse with an LED that lights up when the fuse is blown or missing I got a nice bump in speed going up to the 13.8V that my battery bank runs at. You get in the mid to high 70's running at 12V and 85KPH running at 13.8V. The MM can run at up to 16V and the blowers are designed to work off battery on a boat which could be up around 14V while the batteries are charging. Most 12V PSU's have a voltage adjustment so you could try "overclocking" your fans by upping your voltage but do this at your own risk. I also connected everything up with quick connects so I can swap out fans quickly like you saw in my Seaflo vs TMC videos.
  20. Avenga76

    My DIY Wind Simulator

    Hi guys. To follow up on yesterday's video, here is a video on the current (Amp draw) comparison between the TMC blowers and the Seaflo blowers. Both blowers run under their rated Amperage and the TMC does draw more Amps, 7A for the TMC (Rated at 10A) and 4.5A for the Seaflo (Rated at 6A). Two TMC blowers will draw 14A so you would need a 20A power supply and two Seaflo blowers will draw 9A so you will need a 15A power supply. Because the TMC blowers are drawing more you will NEED to run a heatsink and fan because they will overheat without one. I tested the Seaflo blowers in my fan case and the MM was running at 27c. without the fan it is around 45c with the heatsink alone. The ambient room temperature was 22c so they were only running 5c above ambient, frosty
  21. Avenga76

    My DIY Wind Simulator

    A little update on my Wind Simulator. First up, big thanks to everyone who has ordered one of my controller boxes. Another batch went out today. Can't wait to see them installed one everyone's rigs. BTW, if you are ordering 3D printed boxes from me I can ship them with the fan installed and with the heatsinks if you like. Back to my wind simulator. I finally got around to making the mounting plate for my fans and controller. It is made from sheet metal and uses rivnut. I also installed rivnuts in to the frame of my rig, The plate fits in like the firewall on a car. I will be running ducting up to above the wheel I swapped the lid of my controller box over to my fan lid because I will be running the TMC blowers and they NEED active cooling. Last week I was testing the TMC blowers on my test bench wind simulator and I was seeing a lot faster wind speeds. So as a test on my main wind simulator I connected one Seaflo (on the left) and one TMC (on the right) The two blowers are visually almost identical, all the dimensions are exactly the same except their specs are different. The Seaflo is 6A and it claims to be 270CFM and the TMC is 10A but it only claims to be 230CFM, although the TMC is much faster. I did a side by side test on the same MM and it confirms the results I was seeing from my test bench. With the Seaflo blowers I am seeing around 65KPH wind speed but with the TMC I am seeing around 80KPH. So a 15KPH speed difference. Now this speed comes at a cost and that is heat on the MM. Because the TMC is 10A vs 6A it generates a lot more heat. So much so that a heatsink alone is not enough to cool it, you need to run a fan with it. This is why I designed the lid with the 50mm fan for my controller boxes. Without the fan I stopped my test at 80c, with the fan then it stays at 32c. In comparison the Seaflo would run around 40-45c without a fan. You can run the Seaflo with just the heatsink but there is no way you can run the TMC without a fan, it just draws too much. Even with the Seaflo I would personally run a fan anyway, 45c is fine but just for piece of mind I would run the fan. I haven't done testing yet but I suspect you would be getting in the 20's with the fan and the Seaflo blowers. Now a word of warning, I don't know if I can fully recommend the TMC yet. On my test bench I did see some weird problems. Sometimes one of the fans would turn for half a rotation and then would stop and there would be no status light on the MM for that blower. The other blower would work fine, unplugging the power and USB would clear it but I think it was tripping out one of the protection systems, maybe the overcurrent (it shouldn't do because the peak allowed current on the MM is 30A). I also suspect that it might be a faulty MM because I can't repeat the results yet when running the TMC on my main rig. I am rebuilding my test bench simulator with a new MM and Seaflo blowers just to be on the safe side. I will do some more testing with running two TMC blowers on my main rig and see if they play ball. I will report back with my findings, but for now I still recommend the Seaflo blowers because we know they work reliably. If you do want to try the TMC blowers then make sure you run an active cooling fan and heatsinks because they do run hot. I recorded a video showcasing the speed difference in the fans.
  22. Avenga76

    My DIY Wind Simulator

    Haha. At least you are staying within your comfort zone
  23. Avenga76

    My DIY Wind Simulator

    Been doing some more work on my controller boxes. I have added a 50x50x15mm fan and completely redesigned the lid. Here are some shots of it running The fan is right over the heatsinks so it drops the temperature way down. From about 70c on my big 10A fans down to around 30c. Which is only about 5c over ambient. It also looks damn cool with the LED's on the boards shining up through. Looks even better at night.
  24. Avenga76

    My DIY Wind Simulator

    Here is my video on the effects of the air flow straightener on the wind simulator. You see about a 30-50% increase depending on where the Anemometer is.
  25. Avenga76

    My DIY Wind Simulator

    I did a print at 0.2mm layer height and it came out really well. Looks just as good as the 0.1mm. This means I can drop my price if anyone wants me to print one because it has dropped the printing time from 17 hours down to only 8. Here are some photos. The one on the left is the 0.2mm and the one on the right is the 0.1mm